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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, first time poster here, had a question about using the low-VOC oil based Killz for sealing in some pet odors. Currently in my bedroom I have bare plywood flooring, the homeowner bought a bunch of hardwood but has yet to get it installed. My cat had a couple of accidents in and around his litterbox which as I'm sure you know doesn't smell too good, so I was going to mask off a 6 foot by 6 foot area and lay down 2 or 3 good coats of Killz which should be simple enough. My only real question is, how long so I need to wait before I can move back into my room safely? It says it'll be dry to the touch after 30 minutes, and that I can apply another coat after an hour so i'll be able to get everything done in half a day, but I know even with being a low-VOC paint it's still going to put out some nasty vapors, since I've never painted with oil based paints before I thought it would be best to ask someone who has a bit of experience. Any info is greatly appreciated!
 

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Low voc oil based kilz. Original? Red label? Voc's have nothing to do with how something smells. If you're using the product i'm thinking of, use with LOTS of ventilation. It is full of acetone (no voc's the vapors are heavy and fall vs. Rising into the ozone) and it's a doozy to work around for any length of time. You'll be fine, if you can handle a cat box (ammonia), kilz won't be much different...
As for when you can return to your space-- in a few hours. Do the priming in the morning and give it all day to air out and dry. The acetone makes it dry quickly, and if you're not too chemically sensitive, sleeping in your room that night shouldn't be a problem.
 

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Low voc oil based kilz. Original? Red label? Voc's have nothing to do with how something smells. If you're using the product i'm thinking of, use with LOTS of ventilation. It is full of acetone (no voc's the vapors are heavy and fall vs. Rising into the ozone) and it's a doozy to work around for any length of time. You'll be fine, if you can handle a cat box (ammonia), kilz won't be much different...
As for when you can return to your space-- in a few hours. Do the priming in the morning and give it all day to air out and dry. The acetone makes it dry quickly, and if you're not too chemically sensitive, sleeping in your room that night shouldn't be a problem.
Acetone?? That's a instant headache for me!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
BIN's it is then, I did a little reading on the BINS and it says it takes 7 days to cure properly, I'm a total newbie when it comes to this stuff, so does that mean I should keep the room vacated for a week while it cures? Thanks for the input guys, I really appreciate it.
 

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The good thing about Bin pigmented shellac is that although it has a strong alcohol smell during application, it dissipates quickly as the alcohol evaporates. Ensure good ventilation, and you'll hardly notice it after a few hours.

Of course, there is a water based alternative.

http://www.rustoleum.com/product-ca...b-i-n-advanced-synthetic-shellac-primer-white

It has an odor comparable to other water based primers, and also dries very quickly.


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