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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am installing a 50 amp range circuit although I will be using a gas cooktop and a toaster oven in an apartment I am renovating. The gas cooktop requires a 120v ignition circuit. Am I allowed to run an additional 120V 15 amp circuit into the same junction box? The standard 50 amp box has 1/2 inch knockouts. I wont be able to tie the 15 amp and twin 50 amps with a 'three circuit' breaker. I live in Ontario, but NEC rules and regs are likely to be similar.
 

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I am installing a 50 amp range circuit although I will be using a gas cooktop and a toaster oven in an apartment I am renovating. The gas cooktop requires a 120v ignition circuit. Am I allowed to run an additional 120V 15 amp circuit into the same junction box? The standard 50 amp box has 1/2 inch knockouts. I wont be able to tie the 15 amp and twin 50 amps with a 'three circuit' breaker. I live in Ontario, but NEC rules and regs are likely to be similar.

No, you would need to install a new circuit and 15A breaker. The range box should be a NEMA 14-50 outlet for plugging a 4-wire range into.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am installing an additional 15 amp circuit and breaker. I want to know if I can use the same 'standard 50 amp range junction box' for that second circuit.
 

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I am installing an additional 15 amp circuit and breaker. I want to know if I can use the same 'standard 50 amp range junction box' for that second circuit.

No. It would need to be a complete run of 14-2 cable back to the panel. In fact, you could even run a 12-2 and install a 20A breaker, and add an outlet above it in the cabinet to power an OTR microwave oven. Both the gas range outlet and microwave can be on the same 20A circuit.
 

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If I understand correct, you want to leave the range circuit as is and simply use the range box as a junction box for your new circuit. If the box is large enough then you can run two circuits in the same junction box.
I'm not sure why you want that, just bring the new cable up beside the existing box and add new box for the 120 volt receptacle.
 

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Are you removing the receptacle for the stove? If not the box will not have a space to mount the receptacle for the duplex. Much simpler.just to leave the setup as is and add a new box.
 

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Very Stable Genius
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You're allowed to have 2 circuits in one box provided you meet the
space requirements of 12-3034. I wouldn't recommend it though as it's
just going to make things more difficult.
Easier to add a second box for the 5-15R outlet. This outlet does not
need to be on a dedicated circuit. Depending on the layout it might be
reasonable to drop down with power from the hood fan. It cannot be on
with a microwave or counter top outlet as these must be dedicated.
Stove outlets in Ontario do use 14-50R's but are almost always on 40A
breakers (not 50A) and #8/3 cable. code ref 12-744
Incorrect to assume this is same as NEC.


EDIT: Further note: If you do combine these in the 4 11/16 box
someone will be swearing at you in the future when they have to
do it the way it should be done; with two boxes for two outlets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Many thanks for the answers. I will add a separate box as recommended by you all. FWIW - my reasoning was...
1) At some future date I will replace the gas range with a 42 inch induction range.
2) Even though I will not be using the range circuit it still has to be near the floor and accessible
3) This will require me butchering a base cabinet - so be it.
4) I need the 15 amp for a gas igniter - a separate box means a little bit more butchering
5) When I replace the gas cooktop with an electric range I will no longer need the igniter circuit or separate 15 amp box.

The weight of opinion is that I would be doing something 'wrong' but not against code. That may make the ESA inspector take an even closer look, although I have already passed my first rough-in. Just not worth it.

Many thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
EDIT: Further note: If you do combine these in the 4 11/16 box
someone will be swearing at you in the future when they have to
do it the way it should be done; with two boxes for two outlets.
I understand. I have sworn (under my breath) in this 70 year old building at the knob and tube, aluminum wiring, romex, buried (or missing) boxes, missing earths etc. My record is 14 code violations in one junction box. And that's only the ones I spotted as an amateur electrician.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Canada allows the use of this gas range adapter.

https://www.lowes.ca/electrical-plugs-connectors/woods-gas-range-adapter_g1591919.html

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Thank you. That is the way for me to go. I had no idea that this existed, far less that it would meet code. Protecting an igniter with a 40 / 50 amp breaker does seem odd. Would it be worth wire-nutting the heavy cable into a 15 amp breaker. Then back to the big breaker during electric range installation?
 

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Very Stable Genius
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Thank you. That is the way for me to go. I had no idea that this existed, far less that it would meet code. Protecting an igniter with a 40 / 50 amp breaker does seem odd. Would it be worth wire-nutting one phase of the heavy cable into a 15 amp breaker, then back to the big breaker during electric range installation?

I haven't looked at the one in the link but the ones I've seen had a 15A
fuse built in.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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