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is this regular 3/4 inch thick hardwood flooring?

let the wood acclimate in the area it will be installed in for a week

usually you start along the longest straight wall perpendicular to the floor joists.

start the first row perfectly straight and keep adding to it. you will need to trim door jambs and casing for the flooring to fit under.

you will need clearance along the walls at least 1/4- 1/2 inch. its easier if you remove the baseboards.

pictures of the area help greatly.

what the flooring in the adjacent rooms?

why unfinished? that's what i did in my house but i have did it numerous times over the years because i didnt like the bevels on the prefinished stuff.

if you aren't experienced in finishing floors i would use the pre-finished. once you nail the last piece in you are done.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I haven't totally decided what to get for sure. I am thinking unfinished because I wouldn't have to worry about damaging it so much during installation and I don't like the bevels.

The area is two bedrooms connected by a hallway on a second floor. I am thinking about either carpet in the bedrooms and wood in the hall or wood over the whole thing.

It's new and no doors or trim have been installed yet so that should make it easier.
 

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Go with the prefinished or at least engineered.
No smell, no sanding, walk on it the same day.
No having to move out until it drys.
Far longer lasting finish then a site job.
 

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You are right---the unfinished is faster and much more forgiving of errors---hiring a company to come and sand/ finish is usually quite reasonable----

One item many first timers are not aware of----SPLINES---this is a strip of wood that tucks into the groove and allows you to change your nailing direction---it turns the grove into a tongue----

Very handy with a hallway heading into bedrooms----
 

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There is a book by Bolinger, something like "Installing and caring for wood floors". I've done it myself. The installation is nothing special for a straightforward install. I bought a nailer which you whack with a mallet.

Wear gloves.

I rented a drum sander and an edger. I had a floor buffer which I put a screen on to screen in between coats of finish.

A central vac comes in handy to clean up. Vac the walls also after sanding. I think 3 coats of oil poly is the way to go, minimum. I'm always amazed when I'm finishing wood how long the first coat takes to dry compared with coats two and three.

Anyway, mine came out well. Read the book and diy. You'll be better because of it.
 

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The hard part of DIY is the type of equipment you can rent , And your lack of experience , but there are ways to deal with lack of experience , Read through here there are threads about installing hardwood ,Lay Light grade roofing felt under the hardwood ,Especially on a 1st story .Then get a floor sander and sand it off with 40 grit , Move up to 60 grit nd edge with 60 grit, Then use a ood floor filler , Home depot has it , Sand the filler off with 60 grit , Then fine sand with 100 ,Vibe sand the edges with 100 grit, The problem is the amount of time it will take you ,The way to fix the average DIY mistakes is to use several 100 grit buffer papers and buff The Heck out of it , The disk paper that goes on a buffer is stiff so it flattens the Dimples and edger marks that an begginer will make , Then Buff the heck out of it with a 120 screen , It would be risky for a DIY to use a dark stain , I would steer clear of stain , Unless you have to. Get started and post pictures as you go , People will help you
 

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The hard part of DIY is the type of equipment you can rent , And your lack of experience , but there are ways to deal with lack of experience , Read through here there are threads about installing hardwood ,Lay Light grade roofing felt under the hardwood ,Especially on a 1st story .Then get a floor sander and sand it off with 40 grit , Move up to 60 grit nd edge with 60 grit, Then use a ood floor filler , Home depot has it , Sand the filler off with 60 grit , Then fine sand with 100 ,Vibe sand the edges with 100 grit, The problem is the amount of time it will take you ,The way to fix the average DIY mistakes is to use several 100 grit buffer papers and buff The Heck out of it , The disk paper that goes on a buffer is stiff so it flattens the Dimples and edger marks that an begginer will make , Then Buff the heck out of it with a 120 screen , It would be risky for a DIY to use a dark stain , I would steer clear of stain , Unless you have to. Get started and post pictures as you go , People will help you
That's all the steps plus all the time for clean up, times for each layer to dry.
Installing a prefinished floor go's more like, install floor, walk on it.
 
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