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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Has anyone heard of a "new" underground container system that is being used insted of sewers?. A friend of mine mentioned something about an underground container under the house for black water that filters the water and retaines the solid waste. They are supposed to last about 20 years before they need to be replaced. I plan to build a guest house on the backyard and thought this would come in handy instead of running 100 ft of sewer lines from my house.
 

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Ayuh,... It's called a Septic Tank,+ Leech Field.... Google it up...

They don't come Cheap,+ there are usually restrictions on Where they can be used...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ayuh,... It's called a Septic Tank,+ Leech Field.... Google it up...

They don't come Cheap,+ there are usually restrictions on Where they can be used...

I saw that coming! :no:. No, it would not be a septic tank. It would be a lot smaller, easy to clean, easy to install and affordable.
 

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I think you are referring to a "composting toilet".

Now there has been for a long time an "old" underground container system which did as you described and the container was porous. It's called a cesspool. It is constructed in the same manner as a dry well except not filled with crushed stone and therefore needs a sturdy lid with clean out hatch.

Cesspools (for black water) are illegal in most communities nowadays.

Yet another undeground container system is a holding tank with pump used in communities where the sewer system is at full capacity. Homes use this system to meet a restriction of being able to use the sewer only during certain hours.

Cesspools were installed a little ways away from the house, not underneath. I could conjecture that at one time long ago they were installed like a latrine, underneath the house as part of the invention of indoor plumbing. The toilet was the one and only hatch. The ultimate behavior was pretty much the same as a composting toilet. Sometimes a second, lower level, hatch was also installed to permit removal of the "compost" for other use such as fertilizer.
 
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