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uva uvam vivendo variafit
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see several posts in her about undercabinet power, but nothing I found addresses code issues. I am tiling my backsplash and it is has several
outlets. I want to move all of them to under cabinet with plugmold, but I was told that you can't simply nut the wire connections and stuff them in the wall. I have GFI outlets and I will use GFI plugmold. I assume that all the switched and the outlets are on the same circuit, but I don't know that. Below is a sketch of my wall outlets. I would provide4 plugmolds: one for the 50" counter, one for the small counter above the stove and then one for each side of the L-shaped counter. At the 50" counter, one plug mold would replace two outlets. Can i simply run the GFI up the wall and back out just below the cabinet and then wire nut the standard outlet and leave it in the wall?

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1st, light switches (excerpt disposal) are not on the same circuit as receptacles in the kitchen. 2nd, you cannot make joints in the existing receptacle box and then cover it up with tile. This idea of plug mold is good when wiring the kitchen from scratch, but a bit troublesome as retrofit. I would consider placing items in front of the receptacles in the backsplash for looks and leave them there.
 

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I want to move all of them to under cabinet with plugmold, but I was told that you can't simply nut the wire connections and stuff them in the wall.
You can't ever bury any splice. Every splice must be inside a junction box. And every junction box cover must be accessible forever, non-destructively, without tools and without damaging wall finishes or removing any part of the building.

For instance some folks put a J-box behind a piece of plywood fastened on with drywall screws. Nope. Some like to have a false back on bookshelves. Nope because it will get painted over inevitably. A cabinet door with a latch is fine, the backside of my tub faucet is accessible via one of those.


I have GFI outlets and I will use GFI plugmold.
Kitchen countertop receptacles require GFCI Protection. That does not mean "GFCI receptacles" even if you don't know any other ways to do that. You can use a GFCI breaker. You can use a GFCI deadfront anywhere. With some clever wire routing, you can use GFCI receptacles at non-counter locations where kitchen receptacles are allowed to be.

I assume that all the switched and the outlets are on the same circuit, but I don't know that.
Not possible. Kitchen receptacle circuits can serve only receptacles and only in the kitchen, pantry and dining area. They cannot serve lights, fans, or any switched thing. Other than receptacles, they can serve only a gas range and a wall clock (but those are usually receptacles anyway).

Can i simply run the GFI up the wall and back out just below the cabinet and then wire nut the standard outlet and leave it in the wall?
I would do the whole kaboodle with non-GFCI outlets, so I have the maximum flexibility of products. I would place the GFCI device and reset not in the countertop area... a GFCI breaker, or if I were cheap, a GFCI deadfront mounted at the panel.
 

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Not a Code person but if this is considered an upgrade, does the plugmold and everything feeding it now have to be 20a for counter receptacles?
 

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It's an addition to the circuit, so it hales the circuit into current Code, yes.

The Plugmold needs to be 20A internally rated, but the sockets themselves can be 15A if there are 2 or more sockets on the circuit.

IMO Plugmold is an excellent answer for the "kitchen outlets within 24" of every usable point on the countertop". However OP should take care not to paint themselves into a corner and have all the countertop receps in an area all be on the same circuit. A typical kitchen heat appliance is 1500W, and that means two can't be used at the same time on a 15A (1800W) or 20A (2400W) circuit.
 

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uva uvam vivendo variafit
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. What if I moved the outlets to the far side of the wall as shown in green, below? And if for some reason, I needed to add wire to reach the wall, would that splice be allowed? If I move them to the far side of the wall, then I'd want to put them at 16" +/- above the floor. There might be plenty of wire in the wall for that or there may not.

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uva uvam vivendo variafit
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here's a layout of the house from the appraisal with detail added. I only drew the receptacles and didn't note the GFI's, but this should tell you what you are looking for.
 

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I suppose you could make an argument that the hall behind that wall is part of the kitchen. But someone could easily argue that it isn't.

Note, you don't necessarily need outlets on the back side of the wall. You could put the j-boxes on the back side, and cover them with blanking plates—or install dummy light switches. Although you'd still need to figure out the GFCI bit...but the easy button would be a GFCI breaker on that circuit.
 
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