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I am remodeling kitchen and want to prepare for under-cabinet lighting install. I initially installed outlet boxes in the ceiling so I could plug in an LED transformer and then run to lights, but now I'm thinking I'll use something else that preferably is less expensive and uses line voltage. Therefor, I don't necessarily need the outlets. I have installed a double gang box on the wall that will contain an outlet and a switch for the lighting. Trying to figure best way to stub out wire for lights. Do I just poke it through a hole in the drywall? (The walls are opened up right now.) I have 12/2 coming into the box and outlet. Do I need to stub out 12/2 or can I use something smaller? Is it okay to have a smaller gauge wire coming off the switch when it's on a 20A breaker? If I use something like LED puck lights in series, I'm sure they use light gauge wire; may 16 or 18. Should I match the light wiring gauge coming out of the box, or stub out the 12/2 and then connect to lighting under the cabinet? I don't want any sort of junction box showing.

Thanks.
 

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The answer to your question fully depends on the type of light you choose to go with. Any LED light you choose would require some sort of transformer, often that just plugs in as you mentioned.... even the puck lights would have one and therefore be plugged in to an outlet. While I cannot speak from an NEC code standpoint on stubbing out a piece of 12-2 from the wall (say for under cabinet florescent or incandescent lighting, I can tell you that is what I have in my house. My home was built in 2001 and it looks as though the electrician/ drywaller took a hammer and with one strike beat a hole in the wall, pulled the wire through and ran it straight into the light fixture. while you cannot see it unless you bend down, it probably wouldn't be my method of choice. someone will be by soon to let you know if this is even still code approved. hope you project goes well. post some pics as you move along!
 

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Receptacle circuits in a kitchen can not be used for lighting.
 

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Run a separate circuit for the lighting. If the xformer is plug in, it be plugged into a counter receptacle.
 

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run switched outlets behind the cabinets. plug the transformer/s into these outlets. the wall switch turn it on/off. in my case, i have the multi-colored LED's that have a remote.
i just love em !
 

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Recp. in cabinet for lighting

You can mount a recp. or junction box under sink or top cabinet for led lighting and run wire through walls. The wire must be rated for in walls and voltage. I would make small holes for the wire!
 

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The OP said he wants to use line voltage lights. If he is going to do that, PLEASE don't confuse him with low voltage transformers and wiring.. OP, forger about transformers and low voltage wiring if you do not intend to use low voltage, If you use line voltage lights just remember this. You can't use the same circuit supplying the outlets for the lighting. You need a separate circuit for that. For lighting like that use #14 wire on a 15a circuit. Stub the wire out of the sheetrock at or slightly above the cabinet line. When the cabinet guy hangs the cabinet he will drill a small hole in the lower edge of the cabinet and pull the wire through the edge. From there you can wire up as many under counter lights you want in the same run of cabinets looping under the cabinet area light to light. If you have a break in the cabinets, run another stub out switch leg to them also.
 

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The OP said he wants to use line voltage lights. If he is going to do that, PLEASE don't confuse him with low voltage transformers and wiring.. OP, forger about transformers and low voltage wiring if you do not intend to use low voltage, If you use line voltage lights just remember this. You can't use the same circuit supplying the outlets for the lighting. .
if done the way i did it = it would be very easy to do it either way.
 

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What multi-coloured LEDS are you using? I tried some which are awesome but not bright enough.

Thanks
i got em at HD. but they are all about the same. mine are bright enough for what i need. but they are not intended as "work lighting". i wanted these for the "look".
 
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