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I wanted advice on what kind of paint to use on the walls of an unheated garage? Exterior? I know that flat paint will supposedly hide more blemishes but the flat won't wipe away the scuffs as much will it? Suggestions? Thanks!
 

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That's like asking what's better Chevy or Ford.
The higher the sheen the easier to clean.
Bare drywall?
Prime first, no primmer and paint in one!
 

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Textured walls in a garage, big mistake already, someone was trying to save the time and money to finish the drywall.
Use at least a semi gloss paint.
 

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Not getting that finish or why you can see brown on the wall, New drywall is white.
If it was mine I'd be priming the whole thing then two coats of paint.
 

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You can use an interior latex paint on a garage wall.

Exterior latex paints have UV blockers in them and mildewcides to prevent mildew growth on the paint. In a garage you generally don't have enough humidity for mildew to grow, but if you're concerned about that, then use a paint meant specifically for bathrooms, like Zinsser PermaWhite Bathroom Paint. You don't need UV blockers in your paint because your garage presumably has a roof. So, an interior paint will be all you need in a garage; with or without mildew resistance, as you see fit.
 

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I like sw exterior satin emerald in unheated garage spaces. It's resilient to dang near everything (including mildew)and will hold up very well in the long run. You can use interior products, but they're just not able to take as much abuse...
 

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Just make sure there's no condensation issues in there this time of year. You may run into surfectant leeching if whatever product you're using doesn't dry and cure properly in lower temps.
 

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I really don't know why people are recommending exterior latex paint for the interior of a garage.

People paint the interior of their cottages with interior latex paint all the time, and yet those cottages spend the winter uninhabited and unheated. Yet, no one ever complains that the cold temperatures inside the cottage over the winter months did any harm to the paint.

Conditions in an unheated and uninhabited cottage are not significantly different than those in an unheated garage.

If someone came in here asking what paint to use to paint the interior of their cottage, would we be recommending and exterior latex paint because the cottage will be unheated and uninhabited during the winter?
 
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I don't think interior or exterior makes any difference in a garage since off-gassing won't be a problem but I would use at least a semi-gloss. If you don't have mold and mildew in there now you won't have it after you paint.

I would prime again using 1-2-3. The brown might be from when they textured they had a little too much water in their mix so it made a water stain in the area that's not covered by the texture.
 

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Nestor, lower temps and moisture (wet cars parked in garages) are prime conditions for mildew growth. Not sure if the walls are insulated or not. Also, exterior products tend to be less porous and more resiliant to abuse for some reason (more resins or???perhaps?) They also don't get painted nearly as often as interior spaces. It is for these reasons that I would suggest this product.

Case in point: we did a 1.5 million dollar remodel on a home 10 years ago. (I wasn't with this company then, have just done some maintenence and color changes since then) garage (wooden roll up doors) was painted with interior satin (Bm regal btw) paint. They've been fighting mildew every year with a primary concern about damaging the doors. Repriming and painting every year.
The doors usually begin to mildew in sept. With a full bloom covering the panels by mid nov.

In june, we went out. Cleaned the doors. Primed them and painted with satin emerald. This year, no mildew on the doors. Only on the other areas that didn't get painted. I've done many garages in both interior and exterior products over the years. This one convinces me, yet again, that an exterior product is better designed for this type of application. It can take a beating. And it can take whatever weather you want to throw at it. It can also take whatever the kids throw at it!

I was just there last week and the doors look like I just painted them yesterday. We'll be doing the entire garage in the spring.

Interior spaces tend to be sealed up and insulated better. And sure. You could use an exterior product in a cottage! It certainly wouldn't hurt anything, just needs a little more time to gas off. You just can't use an interior paint on an exterior. It won't hold up.
 

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I really don't know why people are recommending exterior latex paint for the interior of a garage.
Is there some harm in it? Could it possibly cause any problem?

People paint the interior of their cottages with interior latex paint all the time, and yet those cottages spend the winter uninhabited and unheated. Yet, no one ever complains that the cold temperatures inside the cottage over the winter months did any harm to the paint.
Lots of people do lots of things all the time what work perfectly fine. The world would be easy to figure out if things worked one way or the other all the time. If tile always failed over bare plywood, if paint without primer always failed, if smoking killed everyone who ever tried it. So just because it didn't fail doesn't really prove much.

Conditions in an unheated and uninhabited cottage are not significantly different than those in an unheated garage.
They are certainly more humid in a garage in general. Furthermore, the rate of change of humidity and temperature is much higher in a garage than in a relatively shut off and insulated cottage. So the two areas do behave differently.

If someone came in here asking what paint to use to paint the interior of their cottage, would we be recommending and exterior latex paint because the cottage will be unheated and uninhabited during the winter?
Sure, why not?

It's really not that big a deal. There are paints such as this

https://www.dunnedwards.com/products/interior-paints-and-primers/finishes/versawall

Oh and by the way for all the haters, this is not labeled paint and primer in one. However, it is self priming over drywall. There's a difference.
 

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Interior paint usually works fine in a garage, but optimally I would put an exterior eggshell in a garage, personally. Semi-gloss would probably be even better, if you can stand the look.
 

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Is there some harm in it? Could it possibly cause any problem?
No, I can't really see any harm in painting the inside of a garage with exterior paint.

Generally, though, exterior paints use softer binders because they don't have to stand up to hard scrubbing to remove stubborn marks. That's because it's rare to ever clean the outside of a house, except perhaps prior to repainting.

Still, my point is that you don't NEED to use an exterior paint on the inside of a garage. If mold or mildew growth on the paint isn't a concern, then any interior latex paint will stand up inside a garage just as well as any exterior latex paint.

Exterior latex paints have much more mildewcides in them, so if mold growth on the paint proves to be a problem, the OP can always paint over an interior latex paint with an exterior latex paint to correct the problem. Or, paint with an exterior latex to begin with.
 
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