DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is a mid century house. Appears to have two conductor ungrounded wiring. The original outlets are two prong unpolarized.

On the spectrum of: Code compliant...might work but better not...OMG NO!!! can you install a three prong outlet to a two conductor wire by jumping the neutral to the ground? I ask because there is a modern GFCI outlet in the kitchen but no indication that new wire was run through the open basement. So either the ground lug is open, or it's tied to the neutral. I haven't checked which.

And that's only a question because the owner wants to put in some more three prong outlets. So ground lug to neutral, doable or no?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,558 Posts
GFCI on a two wire cable with no ground is 100% legal. The receptacle should have the sticker 'no ground'. One GFCI receptacle can protect the whole circuit if put at the beginning and the LOAD terminals are used.
Jumpering neutral to ground is very dangerous thing. It puts current on all the metal parts of device that is metal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
.

...can you install a three prong outlet to a two conductor wire by jumping the neutral to the ground?...

And that's only a question because the owner wants to put in some more three prong outlets. So ground lug to neutral, doable or no?
Hang on!! This post is giving me the impression that you are doing electrical work for a home owner and this is not your home. This would also indicate that you are charging this homeowner for you to do this electrical work.

If this is the case then I have to say with all due respect that if you are asking these basic questions that any trained electrician would know the answers to off the top of their head then you have no right to be doing electrical work for someone and charging them for it. My question to you is - does your liability insurance cover you in case something goes wrong with the electrical work you do for some homeowner that you are charging? If you are charging them are you a licensed and insured electrician?


.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
I totally agree flyingron.

I was trying to make the point that it is bad enough to be doing electrical work for some homeowner when you don't even know what you are doing but charging them (giving them the impression and false security that you know what you are doing) is even worse.

.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top