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Discussion Starter #1
The box has a cable coming in from the main panel and a cable going out to a junction box powering more receptacles.

I've wired it as follows:

I suspect this isn't the best way to wire it. Do I have to pigtail the neutrals? Should I pigtail all of the wires?

Thanks for any help!
 

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That works and is compliant, but I pigtail, so the choice is yours to make.
 
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Pigtails are needed for the grounds because there is only one green screw on each receptacle unit and two wires may not be curled up under one screw.

It is preferable to connect the incoming (line) neutral directly to the continuing (load) neutral with pigtails to the receptacles themselves but the way you have it is fine.

If you did (fielders choice or otherwise) connect the incoming hot directly to the continuing hot with pigtails to the receptacles then you must similarly pigtail the neutrals.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the explanation. That makes sense that if you pigtail the hots you need to pigtail the neutrals. That way, if one of the receptacles were to fail, you wouldn't have an open neutral while the hot is still, well, hot.

What is the advantage of pigtailing the neutrals?
 

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Thanks for the explanation. That makes sense that if you pigtail the hots you need to pigtail the neutrals. That way, if one of the receptacles were to fail, you wouldn't have an open neutral while the hot is still, well, hot.

What is the advantage of pigtailing the neutrals?
One that I can think of is that you're not relying on the little tab in the outlet to providing neutral continuity.
 

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Pigtails are needed for the grounds because there is only one green screw on each receptacle unit and two wires may not be curled up under one screw.

It is preferable to connect the incoming (line) neutral directly to the continuing (load) neutral with pigtails to the receptacles themselves but the way you have it is fine.

If you did (fielders choice or otherwise) connect the incoming hot directly to the continuing hot with pigtails to the receptacles then you must similarly pigtail the neutrals.
Do the pigtails for grounds need to be connected with a marrett, or can they just be twisted together? My house has a few where they're just twisted together.
 

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The grounds need a crimp or wire nut to keep them together. Twisting alone is not sufficient.
 

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Where I live, it's allowed for bare grounds of 12 or 14 gauge. You have to do a serious job with the twisting -- three or four turns is not acceptable.
I really doubt that a local rule would make such an exemption to the NEC.
 

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not to hijack the thread but i have a related question.

I have about 8-10 15amp rated duplex receptacles on a 20 amp circuit all with 12-2 romex. they are wired similarly to the op's drawing. My question is to properly get the 20 amp rating on the circuit do they need to be pigtailed? I assume the side terminals and that little tab are only rated for 15 amps. Am I correct in assuming this?
 

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not to hijack the thread but i have a related question.

I have about 8-10 15amp rated duplex receptacles on a 20 amp circuit all with 12-2 romex. They are wired similarly to the op's drawing. My question is to properly get the 20 amp rating on the circuit do they need to be pigtailed? I assume the side terminals and that little tab are only rated for 15 amps. Am i correct in assuming this?
its been awhile since i've dealt with a issue like yours bcg.. Ifff im incorrect im most definite that someone will correct me, lol. I believe you will get the proper voltage as long as their wired right from service panel to receptacles.. or vs if their pigtailed. Establishing that firm connection is the key. Everything wired right.. you will get 120v/per receptacle. When bounding to the screw terminal side by side.. i suggest as a safety caution that you take a little black electrical tape and wrap around the side of each receptacle where the screws are to prevent any immediate contact(touching) between the screws on the receptacles.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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I have about 8-10 15amp rated duplex receptacles on a 20 amp circuit all with 12-2 romex. they are wired similarly to the op's drawing. My question is to properly get the 20 amp rating on the circuit do they need to be pigtailed? I assume the side terminals and that little tab are only rated for 15 amps. Am I correct in assuming this?
You are incorrect, 15 amp receptacles are rated for 20 amp pass through.
 
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Rjniles: come to think about you are correct. I just thought about a prior issue i had. Yeah really make since, my digitalmeter was reading off balance..thought it was the $60. Meter. Advice..never work when your totally not functioning(seeing) correctly.
 
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