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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello (and sorry if you seen my previous posting on this project of mine, this should be the last posting on this topic, I hope),

Was hoping to get some input on this wire run. My concern is that there are two black wires running in the same conduit, where one black is going to always be hot, and the other is connecting two lights together and will be hot depending on the PC and magnetic contact switch state. Or should the later black wire be red with black tape on each connecting ends?

Please note that there will be a total of four boxes here, one for the PC (photocell), one for the Magmatic Contact Switch (for GDO) + right side light, one for the light to the left and the forth box for the single-pole switch used to override the photocell + magnetic contact witches.

Also, this arrangement is different from my previous posts/questions in that the location of the PC altered the wire run.

651658


Thank you,
Moe
 

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Code doesn't say anything about wire colors, except that neutral must be white or gray, and ground must be green, yellow-green or bare. You can use any other color for hot, and Code doesn't require you to distinguish 2 blacks if they're in the same circuit.

The closest Code comes is 110.12, requiring "neat and workmanlike" work.

Of course, this invites a confusing mish-mash of colors that takes you hours to figure out when you need to maintain it later.

You don't need to buy discrete colors of THHN wire to distinguish one hot wire from another, colored electrical tape will suffice. So you can use all black wire and use blue, red, yellow tape to indicate function.

So yeah, I'd color that wire red, and remark the "light bulb" wires to red also, so all reds simply go together. And I'd color that other red wire blue. That'd be me.






Ob-disclaimer, you can't re-mark across purposes, so cannot mark a black to be ground, a white to be hot*, etc.

* since we are in conduit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Code doesn't say anything about wire colors, except that neutral must be white or gray, and ground must be green, yellow-green or bare. You can use any other color for hot, and Code doesn't require you to distinguish 2 blacks if they're in the same circuit.

The closest Code comes is 110.12, requiring "neat and workmanlike" work.

Of course, this invites a confusing mish-mash of colors that takes you hours to figure out when you need to maintain it later.

You don't need to buy discrete colors of THHN wire to distinguish one hot wire from another, colored electrical tape will suffice. So you can use all black wire and use blue, red, yellow tape to indicate function.

So yeah, I'd color that wire red, and remark the "light bulb" wires to red also, so all reds simply go together. And I'd color that other red wire blue. That'd be me.






Ob-disclaimer, you can't re-mark across purposes, so cannot mark a black to be ground, a white to be hot*, etc.

* since we are in conduit.
Thank you again Seharper. That makes sense. Just to clarify, when you say:

"I'd color that wire red, and remark the "light bulb" wires to red also, so all reds simply go together. And I'd color that other red wire blue",

do you mean like this? If so, would I run red or black wire for the "blue" wire run and add blue tape at each end?

651678
 

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Yeah, it's your call. You get to do it any way you want.

My suggestion re: making the wire colors reflect their job, is so that when you're actually up on a ladder hooking all this stuff up, you can just mindlessly splice all the blues together, splice all the reds together.

In other words, "front-end load" the design, so you're doing the hard stuff on the design bench, not up the ladder trying to not fall off while holding up the device and hold a diagram showing that in this box blue goes to black lol.


Here's one of my boxes. 21 wires, 8 wire functions (3 circuits + 2 switched-hots). It's up in a drop ceiling where you have to twist your back around the grids to even get in it, and the lighting is terrible. Can you imagine doing this any other way than "same color to same color"? Even then I ran out of colors and had to do some remarking, coulda done a better job with that.


651686
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, it's your call. You get to do it any way you want.

My suggestion re: making the wire colors reflect their job, is so that when you're actually up on a ladder hooking all this stuff up, you can just mindlessly splice all the blues together, splice all the reds together.

In other words, "front-end load" the design, so you're doing the hard stuff on the design bench, not up the ladder trying to not fall off while holding up the device and hold a diagram showing that in this box blue goes to black lol.


Here's one of my boxes. 21 wires, 8 wire functions (3 circuits + 2 switched-hots). It's up in a drop ceiling where you have to twist your back around the grids to even get in it, and the lighting is terrible. Can you imagine doing this any other way than "same color to same color"? Even then I ran out of colors and had to do some remarking, coulda done a better job with that.


View attachment 651686
Totally makes sense. And think I am very fortunate to get someone like you with your experience to weigh in on my wire run/design. That example you posted makes my setup look like a walk in the park. With that, think I am good on my project. BIG thanks for all your time and input.
 

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@Missouri Bound Oh yeah. I need 47 cubes and I juuuuuust make it with the extension box and domed cover.

This is a picture postcard example of why I use 4-11/16" boxes as much as I can.
 
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