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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
when I first bought house the garage was sectioned off into small rooms for there hobbies. I opened garage back up to a 2 car garage, but notice ceiling was sagging. So i climbed up into attic and notice the builder had tied 17 trusses into a double 2x4 truss. now here is the million dollar question what size of truss should they of used to hold the weight? the 17 truss are 30 ft long and the double truss is 24
:surprise:
 

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You should have never removed those walls, until you checked how the trusses were done. Now you have to put a wall up, or a 6x6 supported by jacks, depending on the ceiling height, to hold up those trusses, until you have a engineer come in and tell you how to fix the problem.

This is why you always go crawling around up in attics first, before taking any walls down.

Your Home Inspector should have been crawling up there, before you even bought the house. If you did not pay for one, or took the suggestion from the selling Realtor, you have a huge can of worms on your hand, that the seller may or may not pay for fixing it, same as the Realtor. It all depends on the contract.
 

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If they are actually trusses they would have been engineered for for a certain span.They could have been engineered for clear span and should not be sagging if that is the case.If they ar sagging after removing the center wall they were probably designed for half span .
You need an engineer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
the rooms were add after the garage was drywalled. I plan on adding 2 laminated beams with a center post in the center of garage. Only thing I was wanting to know is do they have trusses capable of holding that weight or should of builder put in a beam when it was being constructed? I have worked for construction companys and remodeling jobs so I do know what is load bearing what isn't. i will post a pict of the trusses later
 

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You can purchase trusses to span virtually any reasonable distance without intermediate support. As the distances get larger, the trusses may be less expensive in steel than in wood. Since you indicate that the trusses were "home made", you would need an engineer to determine what load the trusses are capable of handling.
 

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I am sure on that wall, one was probably load bearing to hold up those ceiling joists. If they are all 2x4, they are under rated for that span and you may have to put in 2x6'x or 2x8's. Putting up a LAM beam down the center, means that you would still have one or two posts in the middle that need footers, same as on the ends for the posts to hold that end. If you go with a Steel beam, you would just need to have to steel support columns welded and most likely sunk into concrete if you want a clear span.

Get with an engineer, get the price on a Steel beam and most likely you will have to redo the joists and rafters if they say that the 2x4's are under rated.
 
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