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Discussion Starter #1
i plan on installing all wood tongue and groove planks instead of sheetrock on my walls and cielings of my addition. my question is since i will be running the walls vertical i need something as a backer- should i use 3/8" sheetrock or plywood for this? i was even thinking about 1/4" masonite but it will be too flimsy and expensive i think...... thoughts?
 

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Use 1/2 inch plywood - better nailing -
unless you're going to add "nailers" between the studs.
Even with "nailers" (blocking) - I would add 3/8 inch D-wall.
Don't use masonite.

"RF"
 

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Discussion Starter #3
sorry should have stated before- no nailers between studs-
i guessded masonite would be a loser.
you figure 1/2 in stead of 3/8? i wonder about the windows and doors all needing jamb extensions then since that will be a thick wall.....
 

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No less then 1/2" sheetrock.
The other materials would be useless, just to thin or flimsy.
Still going to need at least one coat of tape and compound so there's no air leaks.
 

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We've had success with adding blocking and 3/8 D-wall (glued) and screwed
to the studs/blocking.
1/2 inch - better!
At least one coat of tape on the joints.
T&G will not block the air out.
If you're going to install blocking - you can use 1 X 4 - turned flat side to the interior -
inside face of the studs.
More room for insulation.

"RF"
 

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They sell T X G as thin as 3/8 for walls and ceilings.
I use 1/2" to cut down on the spliting.
To fasten I've been using a narrow crown pneumatic staple gun.
The tip fits right on the radis of the tongue.
Good point about using plywood, I would use T X G plywood.
I'm just used to having to cover walls that have already been sheetrocked.
My bad.
Jamb extentions are really easy to make so do not let that scare you.
 

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I would also use glue. I have a hard time believing drywall would hold the staples very well.

I also suggest you consider leaving the ceiling or one wall with the drywall showing. I have a log house and can tell you that too much wood can be overpowering. We drywalled all the interior walls (the few we have) for that reason.
 

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Depending on whether you're going to use plywood or D-wall -
the length of the fasteners, presupposes that: they are long enough to
penetrate (adequately) into the blocking/framing/substrate.
 

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Also - whatever type of T&G you're going to use - 3/8, 3/4....
Get it into the place where it's going to be used - a week or 2 before the install -
After any D-wall taping has occurred!
Acclimation!
 

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Also, let the electrician know what you are using so the boxes and switches will be set out far enough, otherwise fire rings will be in order...
 

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Roofmaster
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Furring strips

Insulate between studs, staple plastic vapor barrier to studs, run 1 x 2 pine strips horizontally 16 inches on center as nailers for T&G. Buy windows and doors with jambs extended. You cant nail into sheetrock. I guess Plywood would work, but expensive. You definately want a pneumatic finish nailer or stapler that takes a 1.25 inch staple for this job.
 

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Roofmaster
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Fire Barrier

Im not sure about the drywall fo fire barrier, but if the whole inside is T&G wood it is combustible. Maybe the studs do have to be covered with drywall to assure their integrity against collapse for a certain amount of time, though. I would not in any case rely on adhesive to a paper faced gypsum board or fastening to it. If you need the gyp, I would put it over the VB, then install the horizontal furring, then the T&G. Maybe a code official can ring in here.
 

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Im not sure about the drywall fo fire barrier, but if the whole inside is T&G wood it is combustible. Maybe the studs do have to be covered with drywall to assure their integrity against collapse for a certain amount of time, though. I would not in any case rely on adhesive to a paper faced gypsum board or fastening to it. If you need the gyp, I would put it over the VB, then install the horizontal furring, then the T&G. Maybe a code official can ring in here.
you are talking about a really thick wall past the inner plane of the wall. the best is to have horizontal blocking located in the wall along with taped drywall covering entire wall and then the T&G nailed with long finish nails through drywall and into the horizontal blocking along with being glued to the drywall. Horizontal blocking needs to be 16" or 24" layout...
 
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