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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if I might need a smaller rubber washer for the toilet tank. The previous bolts had corroded and the tank started dripping so I replaced the bolts with a new set and added new metal and rubber washers that came with the bolts. After getting everything reattached and filling up the tank it started to drip by the bolt that is pictured in the center front in the photos. I'm wondering if the washer in the third picture is too close to the edge of the tank and thus not sealing properly despite the bolt being tight. Or if I shouldn't have metal washer between the bolt and the rubber washer inside the tank.

The first two photos are looking at the tank from the outside. I also notice that there is a slight incline that the bolt in the second photo is located on and if that might also being causing issues.

Any suggestions would be appreciated. It seems like it should be an easy fix - just something not sealing properly.
 

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Naildriver
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That is the correct and best way to install the tank to bowl bolts. The positioning of the outside washer isn't important. What is important is that the corresponding one is flat on the inside bottom and that the nuts are secure. Once you secure the nuts, your bowl can't leak since it is basically double washered. I would replace the black donut since you have it down as it could leak at that booger and it could seem that the bolt is leaking.
 

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Naildriver
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The washer under the bolt head spreads out the pressure over a greater spread on the rubber, so it is a good idea. The type of toilet on the video didn't require a washer under the tank because it had a cushion. Normally there will be a rubber washer under the tank chased by a metal washer and nut to make a water tight tank.
 

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The washer under the bolt head spreads out the pressure over a greater spread on the rubber, so it is a good idea. The type of toilet on the video didn't require a washer under the tank because it had a cushion. Normally there will be a rubber washer under the tank chased by a metal washer and nut to make a water tight tank.
What seals between the washer and the bolt head? The video was just a demonstration of how its done. I have replaced many, the same way. I personally have three toilets that are not leaking that do NOT have a washer between the bolt head and the rubber washer.
This is a 10 minute old picture to prove the point.

Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Vehicle Bumper
 

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I agree. If there is no washer used, the rubber has a large sealing area against both the tank below and the bolt head above. With an added washer it’s likely that water will leak between the metal bolt head and the metal washer. At that point the rubber is tasked with stopping the water from spiraling down the threads of the bolt, which is difficult to do. Many of us have experience with trying to get the rubber washer under a ceramic vanity sink to seal against the threads of a drain tailpiece.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks everyone! The tank is no longer leaking. I took out the metal washer between the bolt and the rubber washer and that seemed to do the trick. Now to try to figure out a dishwasher that doesn't drain after any debris has been removed.
 

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Thanks everyone! The tank is no longer leaking. I took out the metal washer between the bolt and the rubber washer and that seemed to do the trick. Now to try to figure out a dishwasher that doesn't drain after any debris has been removed.
Sounds like you may have pump problem with your dishwasher.
 
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