DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a 1940s house 10 months ago with some lead paint. I've had it XRF'd and thankfully a lot of it is not legally lead paint, but at the same time, apparently, that doesn't mean it does not contain lead paint and I can go to town sanding it next to the neighbors newborn--just not enough to fall under legal provisions. In fact, apparently I'm supposed to still take precautions. Great caveat.

So, I'm having work done, painting etc. and find myself inevitably cleaning up dust and debris from the work or other DIYs. Til now I've been using a wet rag, so as not to take any chances contaminating my Miele vacuum (technically HEPA with the filter, but I use it for cleaning my bedroom and other living areas so I don't want to worry about cross-contamination).

Is it worth it for me to get a small festool for various paint chip/debris cleanup in an old house. I'm talking like a $350 buck small HEPA? Is this overkill? Honest sauce? This lead crap worries/annoys me. I've read the studies and EPA guidance and any and every exposure does something bad to your brain (unlike asbestos or radon or my oil paint giving me cancer in 25 years if i play around with it too frequently) . Luckily for me, the previous owners didnt prime well, and put latex over oil on a lot of trim and doors so those are all chipping/peeling (they are original softwood doors I'm just going to replace when I get to it)

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,584 Posts
I question how much use for that purpose you will get out of it.
I almost never sand paint. I scape off what is loose. However, almost all of my scaping is on outdoor work. But I suppose if you have a 1940's house, you got some layers on the interior too. If the trim is that bad, consider replacing the trim --- it will look a thousand percent better.

But if you need a shopvac, the Festool is pretty good. Pretty quiet. But no such thing as a cheap Festool though. Consider also the price of replacement bags and filters (or even hoses and attachments).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No plans to sand! I don't plan to scape either. My goal is like you said, to basically replace the trim and doors as I can--and pay someone else to do it. I used to do some woodworking so I would love, love, love to be free to work it like any other wood product if it gets dinged or whatnot (including sanding) but alas. So I'm not actively doing any abatement myself. I do have lots of patches that need to be done on ceilings and trim and walls that I've been having painters do, and no matter what, there is always debris left over. Most of them don't even follow RRP rules EVEN WHEN they are certified. Last night there was dust all over my powder room that had been painted and they supposedly sheeted (they didn't fold it correctly). And I have a lot of these projects that are being done/need to be done that aren't replacements but patching areas. It feels like I'm being attacked by deteriorating paint and patches that are needed.

In the scheme of things its not a lot and in a non-hazardous material situation it would be a no-brainer--no special tooling needed for occasional use. But what am I to do with this dust and chips when it occasionally pops up--because I don't think its supposed to go in a regular vacuum. That's my dilemma. Ideally anyone I hire would follow the RRP when working and there would be no remnants but...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I question how much use for that purpose you will get out of it.
I almost never sand paint. I scape off what is loose. However, almost all of my scaping is on outdoor work. But I suppose if you have a 1940's house, you got some layers on the interior too. If the trim is that bad, consider replacing the trim --- it will look a thousand percent better.

But if you need a shopvac, the Festool is pretty good. Pretty quiet. But no such thing as a cheap Festool though. Consider also the price of replacement bags and filters (or even hoses and attachments).
I'm thinking I'm going to get the CT SYS--the smallest model--for portability. Any thoughts on the CT SYS? Unlike the Miele I have, the bags seem to be open when you detach them instead of having a feature where they snaps shut by themselves. This worries me for disposal of toxic debris....

Due to an injury I'm restricted in what I can carry so that looks appealing. Bag capacity is less than ideal but, again, I don't want to touch any abatement: its exclusively for clean-up of any deteriorating surfaces so I can keep my regular miele vac free/uncontaminated to vacuum most of the time. As we speak, the wood threshold on the house that the painters caulked not too long ago has failed and has more lead paint chips on my porch, and I want to go over the bathroom the painters left dust in that I cleaned by hand with water and paper towel with the hepa too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
287 Posts
Consider also the price of replacement bags and filters
One trick I learned to save on bags... when my shopvac bag is getting full, I take it out and cut one end off. After emptying the bag, I'll use a couple of those binder clip things to re-seal the bag end. Then just pop it back in. I might get 5 or 10 or more uses out of it before the main seal around the intake starts to get damaged. But this saves lots of money as those bags are usually somewhat expensive.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top