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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I'm a homeowner considering one of the TimberTech "Capped Composite" products for two small porches at my home.

My contractor mentioned that he doesn't like those hidden fastener systems that are typically used for composite decking projects and instead he likes to use screws and plugs.

In reading about this it seems like people use the hidden fastener system throughout most of the deck and only use screws and plugs on the outer fascia boards.

So I have a few questions:

1. His logic for not using the hidden fasteners involved something about cold and hot temperatures pulling and warping and causing problems. Does this make sense? This project is in the Boston, MA area if that helps.

2. I'm leaning towards the "Terrain" line because I like the Silver Maple color. Given that it's thinner and scalloped unlike other decking boards, would the screws and plugs installation technique cause any problems?

Thanks so much for any tips/thoughts.
 

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Me personally...
If I was going for the extra cost, I would not buy a composite deck. I would buy the aluminum decking that has none of the problems associated with the composite or wood decking.
 

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Does not make any since to me.
I've never even seen anyone use plugs on a composite deck.
If he used the composite deck screws made just for this job there is no need for ugly plugs showing.
A real composite deck screw has two different threads on it. The right hand thread starts the screw into the wood, the left hand thread near the head of the screw pulls the material back into the hole. If the trim head screw is set slightly below the surface a light tap with a hammer compresses the material and covers the screw head.
Setting that screw low enough into the decking to use a plug would leave the screw with no holding power.
With composite lumber the spacing of the joist needs to be no more then 16" O/C, 12" if it's on a diagonal.
Have you been on line and down loaded the install manual for that style decking?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Me personally...
If I was going for the extra cost, I would not buy a composite deck. I would buy the aluminum decking that has none of the problems associated with the composite or wood decking.
Interesting. I'll take a close look at that material when I go to the building supply store to see things up close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks joecaption. I'll pass this info onto my builder. Appreciate your thoughts. And, good point about the instructions that come with the decking. I'll make sure those get into the hands of my builder.

Does not make any since to me.
I've never even seen anyone use plugs on a composite deck.
If he used the composite deck screws made just for this job there is no need for ugly plugs showing.
A real composite deck screw has two different threads on it. The right hand thread starts the screw into the wood, the left hand thread near the head of the screw pulls the material back into the hole. If the trim head screw is set slightly below the surface a light tap with a hammer compresses the material and covers the screw head.
Setting that screw low enough into the decking to use a plug would leave the screw with no holding power.
With composite lumber the spacing of the joist needs to be no more then 16" O/C, 12" if it's on a diagonal.
Have you been on line and down loaded the install manual for that style decking?
 
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