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Hi everyone! First post here.

So few months ago during a period of heavy rain & snow melting my basement flooded. I have a somewhat temporary sump pump that will be getting a permanent install soon so I dont expect the flooding to happen again, though it is possible I suppose if sp fails, etc. So we had some carpet (along with some possible asbestos tile underneath it) when it flooded that I have since ripped up.

I'm now looking to tile the basement floor. I'm a new home owner that works with computers for a living so home improvement stuff is all new to me. However I am a quick learner that likes to do things right, and is somewhat of a perfectionist, so I don't doubt I can tile it myself (well with the help of a friend). So my first question on this project is will I have to lay a subfloor first, or can I just lay the tile directly onto the concrete? Also, should I first use some sort of sealant on the concrete?

Any advice is appreciated!
 

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The tiles can be installed directly on the cement floor which is a durable and good sub floor for tiling. You should also check for cracks in your basement floor and if any they should be repaired before any basement remodeling project continues especially for ceramic tile, as cracks in the cement will actually fracture the tiles at the surface.

Now the easiest and simplest alternative to more traditional flooring options is painting or staining the cement floor that is present in your basement. You have a lot of flexibility with color schemes and any problems that may develop in the floor will remain visible, instead of festering under layers of padding and floors. It is easy to insulate the cold cement floor with a thick throw rug but no matter which route you choose for your basement floor, below ground installation requires that you be especially meticulous in preparing the sub floor for installation and making sure that the space as a whole is suitable for your uses. You should look into having a professional contractor/designer check your basement’s usability and to recommend a course of action for making it usable if it doesn’t seem to be at first. It may be worth the extra investment, as it would be a shame if your newly renovated basement began to creak; buckle, crack and smell from mold from improper installation right after you finished it.
 

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Would you need to do leveling cement on the floor before you do the tile thinset or do the thinset on the cement floor over all the uneven areas filled with the thinset?

I want to tile the floor but thought I would need to do the leveling cement before I do thinset. I guess I don't need backer board for cement floors as well.
Dave
 

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The self leveling compound is really easy to use. Just add the powder to a 5 gallon bucket and mix with water following the manufactures instructions and then poor where required. Once dry you can lay your tile over it.
 

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The self leveling compound is really easy to use. Just add the powder to a 5 gallon bucket and mix with water following the manufactures instructions and then poor where required. Once dry you can lay your tile over it.
You don't want to perfectly level that floor, you want to make it flat but not leveled.

Water still needs to find a way to get to those floor drains in a case of flood...

Flat is what you should try to accomplish.
 
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