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Discussion Starter #1
I am sure this has been covered, but I can't find the answer with a quick search.


We are remodeling the bedroom wing of our house. We have the front bedroom and main bathroom done and we are moving into that bedroom while we remodel the master bedroom, the third bedroom and master bath. I was able to retro fit our 1967 build front bedroom with 14/2 wire so all the outlets could be grounded and installed tamper resistant covers. I also put this one bedroom on a 15A AFCI circuit. My question is: Can I put the other two bedrooms on this same circuit and have nothing more on this circuit? We are talking 4-6 outlets per room and one overhead light.


I have open basement below in the rambler. I want to keep the new wiring separate from the old armored cable wiring from the 1960s. The roof is low sloped (3/12) and there isn't much poking around up there. We will drop the ceiling in this portion of the remodel.



Thanks for any insight.


Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It is always nice to have the lights on a different circuit so you are not in the dark when you do trip the breaker.

I hear you and agree, but being i am going to keep this wiring separate from the rest of the house, two bedroom ceiling lights on one AFCI ($$) circuit seems like a bit much. (Correct me if I am wrong, lights also need to be on an AFCI circuit).


B
 

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I hear you and agree, but being i am going to keep this wiring separate from the rest of the house, two bedroom ceiling lights on one AFCI ($$) circuit seems like a bit much. (Correct me if I am wrong, lights also need to be on an AFCI circuit).


B
As he said, its a nice to have. However, in the event you do trip a breaker...I don't know about you but I'd be willing to wait for my eyes to adjust (assuming it is pitch black night) and go find the breaker to reset it to save myself pulling more wire for two lights.

In my basement I ran 7 circuits (all required due to code reasons) but I put outlets on light circuits. I did this because I was limited to the amount of cans on one circuit per the can max rating. I knew I was using all LEDs so putting outlets on lighting circuits allowed me to use them more fully and not run redundant circuits.
 

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I have gas!
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When I wired my house, I put each bedroom on its own 20 amp circuit (lights included).
It's not like a breaker tripping is such a common occurrence that you need to design for it... and in the unlikely event that the breaker does trip, all you need to do is open the door to be back in a lit space.
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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Seems to me that there are three "theories" on laying-out/designing circuits...(assuming load calcs and code requirements)

1) Orderly and arranged for identification ease (sounds like what you'd like)

2) Mix circuits within a room (such that some lights work if one circuit is broken)

3) Cheapest most economical runs (production building)

All three are fine....It's a subjective choice.
 

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You could install receptacles to meet minimum code - following the 6' - 12' rule, or you could install a receptacle every 4', and it wouldn't change the load on the circuit at all. Receptacles don't use power - the devices you plug in do. Your question should be "what will be the load in these rooms?"
 

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We all are assuming that your lights and receps will be "general use" and you're not planning in running three window A/C units plugged in or electric space heaters all over the place.

You would need load calcs then.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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1920 and 1440 watts respectively for 20 and 15 amp breakers.
I don't know the rules on that breaker.
How about 2400 and 1800 watts. These circuits are not continuous loads.

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