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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My dining room has a 1500 watts heater board with a thermostat on a 30 amp circuit
My living room has also a 1500 watts heater board with a thermostat also on a separate 30 amp circuit.
Everything is open space (kitchen, dining room, living room).

I'm presently planning renovating my kitchen.
In doing so I will remove a small wall that has the dining room thermostat on it.

I wonder if I can put those two 1500 watts heaters on the same thermostat ? (and same circuit ?):vs_worry:
I have to mention that every time I change the temperature on one thermostat I also have to adjust the other thermostat at the same temperature.
 

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Are these heaters 120V or 240V? Anything else on the circuits with them? 30A circuits would be rather unusual to dedicate to such a relatively light load.

What's the amperage rating of the current thermostats? May need to upgrade and that can cause its own set of problems.

Lastly, is moving both heaters to one thermostat going to make things miserable on one side of the room? One side could end up broiling or freezing while the other side is comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Both heaters are 240 volts and they are alone on their breaker (2 X 15 amp).

I will have to change the thermostat to handle both heaters.

That thermostat is on a wall in the middle of the future open space so I think that I wont be freezing or boiling in any part of the room.

I also found that another heaters (in a basement room) is on another breaker (2X20 amp).

My plan is to use that breaker(2x20 amps) too provide the dining room and living room. Use one other (2x15 amps) for the basement room. I will then have one (2x15) breakers unused.
 

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You need to check the watts of the one on the 20 amp breaker. It might be too large for a 15 amp breaker. I can't imagine them using a 20 amp breaker unless it was needed.
 

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Its really not necessary to combine the heaters on one breaker, that wont change anything. The main thing is getting a thermostat that will operate both units...
 

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Both heaters are 240 volts and they are alone on their breaker (2 X 15 amp).

I will have to change the thermostat to handle both heaters.

That thermostat is on a wall in the middle of the future open space so I think that I wont be freezing or boiling in any part of the room.

I also found that another heaters (in a basement room) is on another breaker (2X20 amp).

My plan is to use that breaker(2x20 amps) too provide the dining room and living room. Use one other (2x15 amps) for the basement room. I will then have one (2x15) breakers unused.

2 x 15 is not a 30 amp breaker, it is 2 pole 15 amp breaker
 
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3000 Watts at 240V is only 12.5 amps. Check your existing thermostats, but odds are very good that either one will be sufficient for this.

The branch circuit is required to be rated for 125% of the heating load. 125% of 12.5 amps is 15.625 amps. Technically over 15, but... pfft. If it bothers you, you can replace the circuit breaker with another 15 amp breaker rated for 100% continuous duty.
 
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