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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've bought nearly every kind of glove at Lowes and no matter how tough they look, they just don't last that long.
I use the same gloves for indoor and outdoor work.

Anybody have a suggestion for some durable gloves?
 

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I find that it depends what i am using them for on which gloves I use. I guess I am saying that there is not just 1 perfect set of gloves. Here is an example...

When I am working in water I like to use a rubber glove... but when I am welding a frame onto a motorcycle... well it is nothing but leather.... and if I am digging into my truck engine I have a pair that have lights built in and resist oil.... I guess what I am trying to say is first look at what your inside and outside jobs are and then try to get gloves that match what you are looking to do the most... I would guess I have about 10 pairs of gloves... Well worth the investment since you can not get a skin graft onto those hands
 

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i personally dont wear gloves only in the winter times cause the winter is kind of harsh, but when i do wear gloves i get a pair of deer skin they do last alot longer then regular leather gloves
 

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I seldom wear gloves--I'm afraid of getting my hands pulled into a power tool--

For me---cotton gloves when soldering--leather for handling sharp steel and clean up of demolition.

Oh, and leather for welding (every few years 0n that)
 

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wengang1 said:
I've bought nearly every kind of glove at Lowes and no matter how tough they look, they just don't last that long.
I use the same gloves for indoor and outdoor work.

Anybody have a suggestion for some durable gloves?
Gloves wear out, plain and simple. Inside gloves stay inside. Outside gloves stay outside. I run through a couple pairs a year:
- 2 sets of mechanics types for demolition
- 2 sets of tightly fitting thin goat skin for electrical
- gauntlet gloves for working in the garden
- countless pairs of nitrile gloves for anything else. They keep my hands clean and that thin layer of plastic has saved me more than once from burns or cuts being BAD burns or cuts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
most of the work I do with gloves is outside. That includes logging, splitting, and stacking wood and carrying demolition debris.
Leah, i'm like you, I go through a couple of pairs a year. They're all advertised as "super tough" at Lowe's but before long, they're coming apart at the seams or developing holes at the fingertips.
 

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I have a light pair of leather gloves for outside work such as you describe. I also have mechanics gloves with a magnetic back and no fingers for car work. I also keep a box of latex gloves that I wear if I'm mixing some cement or caulking gutters/etc.

I don't like the gloves at lowes or HD. Have to go with Menards or one of the tool suppliers like grangers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I rember my dad had a pair of heavy fabric gloves that he used for years and I don't think they ever wore out. Wish I could find them.
 

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most of the work I do with gloves is outside. That includes logging, splitting, and stacking wood and carrying demolition debris.
Leah, i'm like you, I go through a couple of pairs a year. They're all advertised as "super tough" at Lowe's but before long, they're coming apart at the seams or developing holes at the fingertips.
If you're doing all that with the gloves, a few pairs a year is all you can expect.
 

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Peeled and pointed tree and concrete forming stakes to help get myself through colllege. Constant twisting and plunging the things into the pointer. I guess I just got used to buying new, thick cowhides and padding them as best I could when I had to buy them. My employers usually provided decent ones and stacks of foam to stuff them with and never asked how fast we went through them. Most were good about sending blades out for sharpening and replacement on a weekly basis too. Nothing like putting a tip on the end of a stick with a dull one!

I like cotton gloves when working with mineral spirits and alkyd paint outside. For some reason, I have never thought to wear them inside. Something about the sun hitting your skin dripping in solvents and alkyd though. Go figure. I don't like painting with gloves.

Those thin, softly tanned deerskin things finish carpenters where are for girly men who cry when they get a splinter.

Working with fiberglass resin, cloth, matt, and roving was always a mess and it did not seem to matter. Whatever was on your hands was melted together by the time the resin catalyzed. I honestly do not remember but I think they were cotton too. I remember coating with something and covering in baby powder to keep foreign glass from embedding in the skin. Close the pours.

I introduced a better doorstop invented by a firefighter. He let me have the thermal gloves we used for the photo shoot. I love them for reaching into burning embers of a non-cooperative fire in the winter or going outside right after to rescue babies, puppies, or kittens left in -40 degree windchills.

I have had to wear surgical type latex gloves at times but hate them. There is something eery about the sound they make or something.
 
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