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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All tools need some explanation for first time users.

The first tool you should learn about is the hammer.

Some basic safety tips for using a hammer:

1. Use the head instead of the claw for hitting hard surfaces.

2. Allow plenty of room for bounceback when using the hammer.

3. Do not place the hammer above your head. Ever! When you are done with the hammer, put it back into your toolbag or toolbelt. If you place the hammer on top of your ladder, 7 out of 10 times, you will forget and it will fall on your head!

Checkout a recent article on the basics of using a hammer: http://www.infobarrel.com/Hammers_and_Nails
 

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Ha, I ended up in the ED for a CT scan after hitting myself in the head with a 20oz. Estwing while cleaning up after painting my son's room a couple summers ago.

All was good, but I am a Trauma Nurse at that hospital. Boy, did the staff have a good time with that.

Favorite jab was from the triage nurse. He asked, "do you ALWAYS paint with a hammer?"
 

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itin1200 said:
Ha, I ended up in the ED for a CT scan after hitting myself in the head with a 20oz. Estwing while cleaning up after painting my son's room a couple summers ago.

All was good, but I am a Trauma Nurse at that hospital. Boy, did the staff have a good time with that.

Favorite jab was from the triage nurse. He asked, "do you ALWAYS paint with a hammer?"
Estwing will get you one way or another. Whoever invented that thing should be shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Eastwing

Metal hammers in general are not fun. I used to use one. I ended up with elbow pain and found out it was because the metal does not absorb the shock as well as wood handled hammers do.
 

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iRelate said:
Metal hammers in general are not fun. I used to use one. I ended up with elbow pain and found out it was because the metal does not absorb the shock as well as wood handled hammers do.
Exactly.
I could tell what kind of a carpenter the new guy was by what kind of a hammer he showed up with.
 

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KemoSabe
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I've carried a fiberglass handled hammer for the last 20+ years, although I don't do much actual hammering anymore. It's generally to tap stuff around before I spray it with gunfire.:laughing:

When it comes to stabbing nails in with a hammer, wood handled gets the job done.:thumbsup:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJGn5mUYt5Q
 

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loneframer said:
I've carried a fiberglass handled hammer for the last 20+ years, although I don't do much actual hammering anymore. It's generally to tap stuff around before I spray it with gunfire.:laughing:

When it comes to stabbing nails in with a hammer, wood handled gets the job done.:thumbsup:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJGn5mUYt5Q
He's using a 14oz titanium California Framer, the same one I was using when I got hurt. That's the way it should be, set slam set slam.
$75, but it's the Cadillac of hammers.
 

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He's using a 14oz titanium, the same one I was using when I got hurt. That's the way it should be, set slam set slam.
$75, but it's the Cadillac of hammers.
That's me and it's a steel head. Craftsman 24 oz, if I recall.:thumbsup:
 

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loneframer said:
That's me and it's a steel head. Craftsman 24 oz, if I recall.:thumbsup:
Oh. You're moving so fast it's out of focus! Have you swung the titanium? You wouldn't think 14oz could do that, but the light weight really let's you snap your wrist. And you're not as beat up at the end of the day.
 

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Oh. You're moving so fast it's out of focus! Have you swung the titanium? You wouldn't think 14oz could do that, but the light weight really let's you snap your wrist. And you're not as beat up at the end of the day.
I tried one that belonged to a friend of mine. Nice hammer, but for what I need one for, it doesn't seem worth the investment. My framing days are limited at best and the hammer plays a supporting role in everything I do nowadays.:whistling2:

You might could tell I put in my time with one though.:laughing:
 

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loneframer said:
I tried one that belonged to a friend of mine. Nice hammer, but for what I need one for, it doesn't seem worth the investment. My framing days are limited at best and the hammer plays a supporting role in everything I do nowadays.:whistling2:

You might could tell I put in my time with one though.:laughing:
Yeah. Framing is definitely a young mans sport.
And I saw some pictures you posted a little while back of some of your tools. You have more than anybody I know by far!
 

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Yeah. Framing is definitely a young mans sport.
And I saw some pictures you posted a little while back of some of your tools. You have more than anybody I know by far!
I have a small collection of hammers that I need to post pics of if I ever get them rounded up in the same place. I gave all my Estwings away. They are the spawn of the devil, IMO.
 

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loneframer said:
I have a small collection of hammers that I need to post pics of if I ever get them rounded up in the same place. I gave all my Estwings away. They are the spawn of the devil, IMO.
If a new guy showed up with an Estwing, I would give him until payday to buy a different hammer.
Or he can go home with the carpenters that show up with rigging axes (they tell me they use them "for when the rafters don't fit right").
 

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i with you guys on the estwing topic.. i started out using them but cant stand the damn things now... for framing i use a 14 oz wood handle stilletto. for general carpentry including finish work i use a japanese nailing hammer from lee valley
 

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woodworkbykirk said:
i with you guys on the estwing topic.. i started out using them but cant stand the damn things now... for framing i use a 14 oz wood handle stilletto. for general carpentry including finish work i use a japanese nailing hammer from lee valley
That's what I've been talking about, the 14oz titanium. A lot of people don't realize how powerful of a swing you can get with something so light.
 

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Love my Estwing.

But use it mostly as a ripping/demo tool. Don't hammer many nails these days.

That's what nail guns are for, aren't they?
 

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Haha.

I'm 45. Spent my life as a journalist, then went to nursing school.

Have been a trauma nurse for almost 6 years.

Avid DIYer, not a pro in any way.

And yes, I agree with the posts about the Estwing. Have had it for almost 15 years, but anymore I don't really use it for hammering.
 
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