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I've got a 1901 two story Victorian that I'm starting to remodel and upgrade to modern things like new electrical, bathrooms, kitchen, etc. , but living here in an area of calif where the mornings are 30 and my home has an old gas floor furnace (which I do not trust), and is currently disconnected, I'm trying to find a temporary solution for heating. Electricity here is expensive and gas is cheap. These old lathe plaster walls seem to keep cold air in during winter and hot air in during the summer.

By spring I should be done with major work and will be putting in a high velocity mini duct system throughout the home.
 

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strict codes here for using gas furnaces as temporary heat.... we do it all the time for new housing..... you codes may be different.....:thumbsup:
 

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JOATMON
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Hey....those old floor heaters are pretty tough and reliable....not a whole lot to go wrong. As long as the gas manifold is not cracked, it's clean in there and your exhaust flue pipe is intact.....crank her up. Mine was over 50 years old when I took it out....the only reason for removing it was because we had a new baby and the bedroom was cold....have to love forced air heating.,....
 

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cleveman said:
Just crank up a kitchen range.
Don't do that with a gas range, though. Or electric, if you're paying the bill. When I was younger, living in a basement suite, my landlord would turn my electric baseboard heat off, but would always blame it on his two-year-old (can two-year-olds reach a 5' high thermostat, with no chairs, tables or ladders around? It was in his foyer, not in my suite). Sick of his BS, I started to heat my suite with the electric range. When it got too hot, I'd just open a window. The electric meter spun like a top.
 
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