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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of installing a basement perimeter drain, and have already busted up about 45 linear feet of the slab. The area I have to bust up next is where my well tank is located so I need to temporarily relocate the tank while I bust up the concrete beneath it, and probably need to leave it in its new temporary location for a couple weeks while I finish the waterproofing (I'm working solo so it's gonna take a while.) The tank is only 3 years old so it is in good shape.



Other than shut off the power to the well pump, drain the tank, and shut off the water to the house after the tank and cutting the pipes, is there anything else I should do? The piping is CPVC and I plan to reconnect using PEX and Sharkbites for the temporary setup. Once the floor is done I will remove the Sharkbites and pex and reglue CPVC like before.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's a great idea, but wouldn't work in my case. The equipment is in a small alcove with a low concrete ceiling, no rafters.
 

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Naildriver
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Pressure is pressure, so it won't matter where you relocate it, even if it is temporary. Just extend the piping as needed as well as any electrical if it is inside as well.
 

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Don't jump at the idea of suspending the pressure tank up and out of the way.

Water is heavy, something like 8-1/2 pounds per gallon, or about 250 lb. for 30 gallons. (Plan for the possibility the tank could get waterlogged i.e. completely full of water.) Add to that the weight of the tank itself and we're close to 350 lb. Not something you can hang from the ceiling like a ceiling fan or a child's swing.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yeah, I'm not suspending it due to the lack of rafters in the area, and if I was to go that route I would have built a sturdy platform rather than hang it.


Sounds like there's nothing special I need to do when I hook it back up, so I'll just shut it off, drain it, move it out of the way and get back to jackhammering (still recovering from last weekend so I'm taking a weekend off on the project.)
 

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You said, """ Other than shut off the power to the well pump."""

Never shut the power off to the well pump unless you're replacing it, it could lose it's prime.

If you don't have a valve to shut the water off right after it comes into the house, now would be a good time to install one.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I do have a valve there, but I need to extend the wiring to move it. Plus, when I drain the tank if the power is still on, won't it try to fill the tank again?



What happens when a storm rolls through and knocks out the power? I haven't lost prime then.
 

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In order to keep using water you need to hook up the pressure tank again, at its temporary location. Then drain it again and move it back to where it was after the floor work is done.

... Never shut the power off to the well pump unless you're replacing it, it could lose it's prime. ...
A very crippling rule if you have to obey it.

Cannot cut the main line let alone install a valve on it when the pump is alive.

Cannot have the pressure tank out of the picture otherwise the pump will beat itself up short cycling against the capped off (or, later, valved off) main line.

Cannot depressurize the system to establish a reference for re-presetting the pressure tank.

What happens if there is a power failure?
 

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Naildriver
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I don't see much difference in the pump turning off on its own and you cutting the power. If it loses its prime, it will lose it each time the pump shuts off.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
In order to keep using water you need to hook up the pressure tank again, at its temporary location. Then drain it again and move it back to where it was after the floor work is done.
This my plan exactly. Project will take several weekends so we can't be without water.
 

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In order to keep using water you need to hook up the pressure tank again, at its temporary location. Then drain it again and move it back to where it was after the floor work is done.


A very crippling rule if you have to obey it.

Cannot cut the main line let alone install a valve on it when the pump is alive.

Cannot have the pressure tank out of the picture otherwise the pump will beat itself up short cycling against the capped off (or, later, valved off) main line.

Cannot depressurize the system to establish a reference for re-presetting the pressure tank.

What happens if there is a power failure?
"" What happens if there is a power failure? "" Then you could be ****-out-luck.

It's your pump use it any way you want. But it only takes one time and you won't want to make that mistake again.
 

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I don't see much difference in the pump turning off on its own and you cutting the power. If it loses its prime, it will lose it each time the pump shuts off.
When it's energized it keeps the pressure on it.
Install a shut off valve and you don't have to cut the electric off to the pump.
 

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Naildriver
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When it's energized it keeps the pressure on it.
But when it is deenergized, such as when the pump turns off, there is nothing to hold pressure . Only the check valve in the foot, or in line would prevent water prime loss. He has to cut the power to the pump in order to move the tank.
 
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