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Big Dog
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a Craftsman 113 series table saw I acquired about 20-years ago. It is a 3hp, 10” belt drive with a 27-inch deep cast iron top with webbed cast iron wings.

These saws often get a bad rap due to issues usually having to do with fence accuracy.

Over the years I have slowly made improvements. The fence was the first thing to get replaced. I installed a Delta which is essentially a Biesemeyer as Delta owns that company. This was followed by replacing the blade with a 50-Tooth thin kerf combination blade. Both cast pulleys were replaced with machined ones and the v-belt replaced with a link belt. These changes dramatically improved the smoothness of operation and accuracy of the saw.

The other issue I have had has to do with the out-feed.

It is about 8.5-inches from the center of the blade to the back of the table top. When I cut longer pieces of wood, the cutoffs would often fall onto the motor. The belt has a shroud so it was unlikely the cutoff would cause interference with that but still it was a concern especially with heavier cutoffs striking the motor.

I do have and use a foldable out-feed stand for long ripping operations. However this can be a real inconvenience when cutting smaller pieces. I have a small shop so to use the stand means pulling the (heavy) saw away from the wall, swinging it around 90 degrees and setting up the stand.

To resolve this, I decided to build an extension table attached to the saw.

After a careful evaluation of my needs, work space and saw layout, I settled on a 12” table. With that issue decided, I began acquiring supplies.

This project began by obtaining two 8”x12” steel shelving brackets.

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According to the description, these brackets have a 1200 lb. capacity per pair. Of course I had no intentions of putting anywhere near that much weight on it but it meant they were more than adequate for my needs.

I also bought one sheet of 2’x4’ 3/4” plywood and one sheet of 2’x4’ 1/4” plywood.

The back rail for the fence system protrudes out about 2” so to maximize support of the table, I began by cutting two spacers 1” thick by 1-1/8” wide and a 10-1/2" long.

On the 8” side of the shelving bracket (which will be bolted to the saw), I enlarged the mounting holes to 5/16” and using some clamps determined where on the saw the brackets and spacers needed to sit. Once this was determined, I marked for the holes on the spacer, stuck the two of them together with tape and drilled the holes through both pieces simultaneously. This ensured the holes would be uniform on both spacers.

I then bolted the bracket with the spacers to the saw using 5/16” bolts.

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On the 12” side of the bracket, the hole closest to the end is the only one centered. I enlarged these to 5/16” (yellow circles). The remaining holes were not spaced in a manner that would work so I had to drill 2 new holes (red circles). I laid down a piece of painters tape on the bracket, located the center line and worked out how far from the back rail to put it. Using a spring punch, I pinged a starter hole. I placed a couple drops of oil in the dimple and using the drill on a slow speed drilled the 5/16” holes. This completed the bracket setup.

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Up next the table.
 

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Big Dog
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I know turned to the table itself.

I ripped the 3/4” plywood right down the middle. I laid an old vinyl black-out blind I keep for the purpose on the table saw and taped a piece of wax paper to the table saw fence. I placed one half of the 3/4” plywood on top and using a Bayer roller, spread an even layer of Titebond III wood glue across the whole piece making sure to get the edges. I placed the second piece on top aligning the factory edges so both were on the same side and pressing the short side against the wax lined fence to help keep everything square. (Wax paper keeps squeeze out off the fence) I placed weights on top of the assembly and let it cure overnight.

Once the top was set, I placed it on the rack and adjusted the distance from the back rail so the table did not interfere with the sliding action of the fence. I aligned the right side so it was 3/4” in from the edge of the webbed extension (there is a reason for this). I then marked the underside of the table through the holes in the bracket for the 5/16” bolts.

Chucking a 3/16” bit in the drill press and I drilled a hole through the center of each mark all the way through the table. Switching out for a 1" Forstner bit, I flipped the piece over and using the 3/16” hole as a guide drilled down enough so the head of the bolt was just below the surface of the table. As one of the bolts was in the path of the miter slot that would eventually be cut, that one had to be sunk a little lower than the others. I then test-fitted the table on the bracket ensuring the bolt lined up with both. The bolts were then removed.

I ripped the 1/4” plywood right down the middle. This was placed on top of the table with factory edges of both pieces aligned on the long side. Using a couple of f-clamps, I secured the pieces together. It was then placed on the brackets and bolts inserted from below to align it.

Using the miter slots on the table saw, I drew lines to indicate where the miter slots would later be routed out. I drew a cut line on the left side also 3/4” in from the edge of the webbed extension. I then measured out the perimeter for the screws that will secure the top to the table. These are spaced uniformly for aesthetic as well as functional purposes. I then drilled the holes using a counter-sink bit. The top was secured using #8 x 3/4” screws. These screws are temporary as longer ones would be used on the finished piece.

Using a 5/8” straight router bit (largest I have) and a straight edge I routed the two miter slots moving the straight edge over for each one to get to the required width.

The table was then removed from the brackets, and the end previously marked on the left side cut off. The 3/4” screws were removed along with the top which is now in three pieces. The table was placed on the brackets and bolts with washer inserted from the top but not yet secured from the bottom. The top pieces were put in place and secured with #8x1-3/4” screws. Note: No glue was used on top panel in the event the table needed to be removed in the future.

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Before securing it, I had to adjust the height so it was level with the saw top. I did this using washers as spacers between the bottom of the table and top of the brackets. Once I had the height set, I secured the nuts on the bottom.

Using 1x3, I framed the perimeter using mitered corners to cover the plywood edges, help keep the top flat and to give the work a more refined finished appearance. This was the reason for making the top undersized in relation to the table saw top. With the framing installed the top is now the same width as the saw top.

The framing was finished off with a 1/4" chamfer along the top edge.

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Naildriver
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I found even my Delta unisaw was inadequate as far as run off was concerned. Our church was demolishing a building for expansion. I scavenged two extremely heavy solid core smooth doors and made a run off/banging table 5' wide to match the unisaw and 36" deep. Wonder how I ever worked without it. I may expound on your idea for a "run in" table, as medium sheets of plywood are difficult to handle before they touch the blade. Having a little cheat room would help. Great idea.
 

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Big Dog
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Discussion Starter #4
I may expound on your idea for a "run in" table, as medium sheets of plywood are difficult to handle before they touch the blade. Having a little cheat room would help. Great idea.
I agree. You can never have to much support especially when handling larger sheet goods.
 

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I have one of those Craftsman saw also and yes the fence and miter gauge were the first thing to go. Then put a link belt on it. Replacement fence was a Craftsman Delta/Biesemeyer knock-off, miter gauge an Incra. Both made a world of difference when coupled with Freud and CMT blades. No room for outfeed or infeed tables. For outfeed I clamp a board to my drill press table and set the height. Works OK. I can handle infeed of 4x8 plywood myself expect 3/4 or thicker. I break that down on sawhorses.
 

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Good move big dog. I have a Rigid with a similar problem. I made a folding outfeed support, pivots at the bottom, adjustable chains and turnbuckles at the top. Looks like crap but works well.
 

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Big Dog
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
For outfeed I clamp a board to my drill press table and set the height. Works OK. I can handle infeed of 4x8 plywood myself expect 3/4 or thicker. I break that down on sawhorses.
The out-feed table only sticks out about the same distance as the motor so there is no added space was required to have it.

For the breaking down of full sheets of plywood, I have to move the saw and use an outfeed stand. Most times I will use sawhorses and a circular saw as well for this sort of task.

Good move big dog. I have a Rigid with a similar problem. I made a folding outfeed support, pivots at the bottom, adjustable chains and turnbuckles at the top. Looks like crap but works well.
Thanks Eddie. I use projects like these to experiment with techniques and enhance my skillset which can be used on more refined projects.
 
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Big Dog
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Discussion Starter #8
... continuing...

As you can see, by going with a 12-inch top I was able to gain almost 15-inches of out-feed table which gives me 38-inches of table from the middle of the saw blade.

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For the finish, I used some semi-transparent stain I had laying around from a previous project.
After sanding with 220 grit sandpaper, I applied a generous coat of pre-stain conditioner and let it sit for about ten minutes after which I wiped of the excess. This was immediately followed up by a good coverage of stain. I let the stain sit for about five minutes and then wiped the excess. I did not want to apply to much stain out of fear of covering up the Celtic Trinity image (another experiment).

After the stain dried, I applied three coats of clear gloss poly acrylic lightly sanding with 220 between coats.

Here is the finished product.

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As you can see, adding this out-feed table gives me ample support for my table saw sled.

639777
 

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... continuing...

As you can see, by going with a 12-inch top I was able to gain almost 15-inches of out-feed table which gives me 38-inches of table from the middle of the saw blade.

View attachment 639770

For the finish, I used some semi-transparent stain I had laying around from a previous project.
After sanding with 220 grit sandpaper, I applied a generous coat of pre-stain conditioner and let it sit for about ten minutes after which I wiped of the excess. This was immediately followed up by a good coverage of stain. I let the stain sit for about five minutes and then wiped the excess. I did not want to apply to much stain out of fear of covering up the Celtic Trinity image (another experiment).

After the stain dried, I applied three coats of clear gloss poly acrylic lightly sanding with 220 between coats.

Here is the finished product.

View attachment 639776

As you can see, adding this out-feed table gives me ample support for my table saw sled.

View attachment 639777
KUDOS! Nicer than some furniture I have had or seen.
 

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Big Dog
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Discussion Starter #10
KUDOS! Nicer than some furniture I have had or seen.
Thank you Mike.

Here are some important lessons others could benefit from.

Lesson one: Before measuring and cutting the table and miter slots, actually bolt the table securely to the brackets. I just ran the bolts through the table and the bracket. Since the bolts and holes were both 5/16”, I thought it would be enough to hold everything in place… Nope.
Because I did not secure it, somehow the table shifted slightly. The table alignment is off by about 1/8” from the edges of the saw itself and I had to slightly widen the miter slots.

Lesson two: Space the brackets low enough so 2 washers and nuts can be placed between the bracket and table in the following order;

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This makes it easier to adjust the table height just by turning the nuts right above the bracket.

Tighten down the nut under table.
Turn the nut above the bracket until the table is at the required height.
Once the desired height is achieved, tightening the nut below the bracket will lock everything in place.
 

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Usually Confused
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Very nice BD. I have had the exact same saw since new and am also tight for space. I usually use stand supports but they can be a pain sometimes. I'd love to have a large outfeed/work table but, alas. For large panels I'll usually rough cut in the garage to managable sizes.

Thanks for posting! I'll add it to my to-do list.
 

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Big Dog
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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you lenaitch
 

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Big Dog
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Discussion Starter #14
Great solution. And my 70s era Craftsman saw thanks you too!

Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk
Thank you.

I am glad my project can be of help to others.
 

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Big Dog
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Discussion Starter #15
The effort paid off.

I got to use the outfeed table for the first time while ripping some 2-foot strips for a project.

The outfeed extension made this a lot easier since I did not have to deal with pieces falling off the end of the table. I think this also enhances safety. The fact that the pieces sliding between the blade and fence no longer tips off the end reduces the chance of the wood pinching and kicking back.
 
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