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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i was using my seldom used table saw today. i let it sit for a little bit to do something else. went back to it and it wouldn't run, motor turns by hand only but is nearly locked up. it got pretty hot. idk if it will run after it cools. the saw is pretty old, from the 80's i am guessing. anyway, if the motor doesn't run again, what should i be looking for ?


thanx
 

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Usually Confused
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That looks like an old Craftsman 113 series saw, which will be belt drive. When was the last time you blew that sawdust out of the motor? If the motor turns freely off the belt, the arbour bearing may be shot. I don't know how servicable they are. I've had one since new and they are (were) solid machines. All I have done to mine is a zero clearance insert and a better fence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
belt was off. it was mostly cooled off last night, still stiff. it could be saw dust, but it started and ran fine several times yesterday. after it stooped running i blew it out with my leaf blower, that did not help. one thing i did do, the belt is getting worn, so i tightened it up some, not car belt tight, but tighter than it was. maybe i wore a bushing, but the shaft is not loose.
 

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Big Dog
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I have a 10", 3hp, 113 series table saw which was built in '95 or '96 and looks almost exactly like the OP's. I retrofitted the fence with a Delta (essentially a Biesemeyer), swapped the cast pulleys for machined ones, installed a link belt, safety switch, zero-clearance insert and retractable casters. It has it's original motor which I blow out regularly with compressed air along with all the moving parts inside.

The belt tension is essentially governed by the weight of the motor on it since the motor has to pivot when the blade is raised or lowered. If the belt is over-tightened it could put undo stress on the motor bearings especially when adjusting the blade height. This will bind them and prematurely wear them out.

If it is the the bearings and they cannot be replaced, the only option is motor replacement. New motors can be had for between $150 and $200 depending on the horsepower rating. You may be able source a used or rebuilt one at a lower cost.
 

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I would pull the motor cover off, not the end covers, but the one where the wires come from the switch, and use a voltmeter to see if you have power to that point. If not, I would go upstream and check the switch. With the heat the past few days I would not be surprised to find a bad switch. If you do have power at the motor, I would first clean it out again, and if that doesn't work see what the brushes look like. You want to be careful blowing things out because sometimes you can worsen things by blowing the dust deeper inside rather than out. Motors are not that difficult, just need to take a picture on your phone or make a sketch of where the wires go, then things apart and put them back together in order. A half hour or so you could be back in business or at least know where the problem is.
 

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That looks like an old Craftsman 113 series saw, which will be belt drive.

By the way, not that it matters except if someone happens to be watching CL or wherever for one, but not all 113's were belt drive; they included at least some of the flex shafts as well. I know this because I have one of those POS. And I'm using that term tongue in cheek because that has been the popular consensus over the years, but mine has been used a lot more than many I know of and has not given me one ounce of trouble. I bought it new in '85 or '86, when there weren't near the number of choices that there are today, I was all set on whichever model the belt drive of the time was, and can't remember what it was any more but knew a couple of guys who had bought them ahead of me it sounded like there was some inherent problem. So I very reluctantly bought the flex shaft one, knowing that I would replace it in a few years. But, as I said, that was 34 or 35 years ago, it's been great, and I have never had any reason to consider replacing it. In fact, I tune it up about once a year or so, but I still have the original fence on it and despite all the griping about those it works perfectly too. It's no Biesemeyer or anything like that, so yes, I probably spend a little more time setting things up and double checking, and it's one of those things that I will likely upgrade one of these days, but, if one maintains it periodically, just like I do with other shop tools, I can attest to the fact that it can be kept accurate as well.
 

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So now you have the problem isolated, but before you open the motor itself, does it have a capacitor that might be bad? It would be in a box on the side of the motor, where the wires from the switch go in. Sometimes a bad capacitor will be obvious, swollen and/or burnt, but not always. I sometimes confuse confuse myself when it comes to checking them out and don't want to do that to you so will leave the diagnostics to someone else, but probably worth checking before taking the motor itself apart.
 

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The electric chain saw i bought at an auction didn't run very long. After cleaning i discovered it actually had a electric motor. Your motor could look similar minus the chain/bar oil.


Disassembly and cleaning may not solve the problem but you won't know until it's been done. It's not that difficult. But here is a simple tip to prevent some frustration.


After removing the through bolt nuts tie a piece of string ( even sewing thread will work ) a couple ft. long to the threads before removing the through bolts and with a felt tip pen, or any favorite method, label the position of each end cover in relation to the motor body. When it's time to re-assemble you'll appreciate the string to pull the bolts back through if the strings are long and the string ends have been threaded through the first end cover bolt holes and the bolts not removed from the second end cover.




EDIT: EDIT:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So now you have the problem isolated, but before you open the motor itself, does it have a capacitor that might be bad? It would be in a box on the side of the motor, where the wires from the switch go in. Sometimes a bad capacitor will be obvious, swollen and/or burnt, but not always. I sometimes confuse confuse myself when it comes to checking them out and don't want to do that to you so will leave the diagnostics to someone else, but probably worth checking before taking the motor itself apart.
you know, i didn't even think of that. but really, if that was it, the shaft would turn easily.
 

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You're right, with the power off and the belt off, it should turn freely, and a bad capacitor will not affect that one way or the other. I'd still at least take a look at it, and meanwhile take the motor off the saw, should be just a couple of bolts, turn it on end, and see what if anything you can shake out of it, maybe take a small stick and work out all of the sawdust. Look in the end of it too and see if you can see the brushes. Should be on the "dumb end", opposite the shaft, I imagine. Maybe they're burned down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ok, i may have fixed it. i was looking at the motors messed up label. and i got "oil" and "2 years" off it. so i looked, and sure enough there was a oil port on each end. i put some 10w30 in there and worked the shaft, seemed to loosen a little. so i hit the switch and it ran fine. i still have to put the belt on it, but the blade turns with so little effort it like its not even there. i will report back later.
 

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Well gee whiz, you didn't tell us that you were abusing it by ignoring such things! Just kidding, I'm sure that you were not the first to let that go, won't be the last, and seriously doubt that you hurt it. And now you have something to remind you to look for things like that. Now, if you want to pamper the saw a bit, clean the table real good, wipe it down good with Johnson's paste wax, let it dry, buff it with a rag, and you'll have a surface less prone to rust and easier for the wood to glide across. Off topic of the problem I know, but figured you owe it something for the oversight.
 

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I'd (even tho you think the oil did the trick) be looking for a motor.
I've used my saw, earlier and cheaper model than yours, off and on for 20/30 years. With the wiring set for 220. But everyone that rebuilds these dates puts a true 1 hp or 1.5 hp motor on them.
Look a YouTube. There must be a dozen or more rebuilding videos. Some even list the parts by current nomenclature.
 

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Big Dog
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Now that you have it running again, I strongly suggest you opt for the machined pulleys and a link belt. They will dramatically reduce vibration which translates into better cuts.

I can rip strips thinner than an 1/8th inch on mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Well gee whiz, you didn't tell us that you were abusing it by ignoring such things! Just kidding, I'm sure that you were not the first to let that go, won't be the last, and seriously doubt that you hurt it. And now you have something to remind you to look for things like that. Now, if you want to pamper the saw a bit, clean the table real good, wipe it down good with Johnson's paste wax, let it dry, buff it with a rag, and you'll have a surface less prone to rust and easier for the wood to glide across. Off topic of the problem I know, but figured you owe it something for the oversight.
i didn't know. can't say i have heard of a lower'ish grade consumer motor that needs oiling.

the table has no rust on it. and for my needs is just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'd (even tho you think the oil did the trick) be looking for a motor.
I've used my saw, earlier and cheaper model than yours, off and on for 20/30 years. With the wiring set for 220. But everyone that rebuilds these dates puts a true 1 hp or 1.5 hp motor on them.
Look a YouTube. There must be a dozen or more rebuilding videos. Some even list the parts by current nomenclature.
for my needs, this is almost a beater saw. as long as it works, its staying as is.
 
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