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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Theoretically speaking...

I have a fixture that no longer works. It is hard wired inside the wall to the light switch.

I do not want to open the wall -- but am wondering if this sounds plausible:

If I were to cut the wire that exits the wall and enters the fixture -
Then cut the wire of a new LED fixture -
Then wire them together and wrap / insulate the connection properly -
Could I then just hang up the new LED fixture and toss the old one -

And have a new light that works?

Thanks in advance to all!
 

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Knows Enough to be Danger
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Are you talking about swapping the fixture, or removing the old fixture and putting a new one some distance away?

If you're trying to relocate it, you would need a junction box where the wires come out of the wall.

If you're trying to replace the old fixture, you can just wire the new one into the existing box. Provided you buy an LED fixture rated for 120V.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The broken fixture serves as a light in a large closet.

I just want to reach up -- pull the old fixture away from the wall -- and snip the wires.

Then expose them.

But a cheap LED fixture that will fit in the same spot - snip its wires - expose them as well.

Then twist the exposed wires together, wire nut them, electrical tape wrap them.

Then hang the new LED fixture right back up in the same spot.

Does that make it any clearer?
 

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It sounds like your new fixture comes with a plug on the cord. Use the old wires and install a box with a receptacle. Then plug in your new fixture.
Cutting, joining and wrapping tape is not a proper code connection.
 

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Usually Confused
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The broken fixture serves as a light in a large closet.

I just want to reach up -- pull the old fixture away from the wall -- and snip the wires.

Then expose them.

But a cheap LED fixture that will fit in the same spot - snip its wires - expose them as well.

Then twist the exposed wires together, wire nut them, electrical tape wrap them.

Then hang the new LED fixture right back up in the same spot.

Does that make it any clearer?

By the words used I get the sense that you are not that familiar with working with electricity so I will say first that anything you do has to be done with the lamp's circuit turned off - at the circuit breaker - not just the switch.
The wires of the current fixture will be connected to the wires exiting the wall by wirenuts or something similar - you don't have to snip anything. All wire connections have to be made in an accessible 'device box' and as far as I know, tubular florescent fixtures qualify. Remember the colours and connect the new fixture the same way. They may also be a green or bare ground wire attached to a screw on the fixture. Disconnect the wires and remove the old fixture. You can install the new fixture by a reverse of the above IF the fixture qualifies as a device box (you don't say what new fixture you envision). Many ceiling lamps do not and you would have to install a junction box (not only to make connections but to actually mount the box). You don't need electrical tape on the wirenuts but you can if want.
I've probably forgotten a step or caution or two.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We've actually spoken on here before...

But either way -- I'm no electrician -- but I am not completely daft.

Step One:
Shut the breaker

I'm talking about a simple little 2 foot strip light.
Something like the one in the photo.


Then - rather than try and snake the wire down to the switch box -- and reconnect it there --

I wanted to just snip both wires so that and twist the new one to the old one and then use velcro to put the new light up.

Nothing fancy - it's the top pf a pantry closet.

I guess what you're telling me is you think it's a bad idea.
 

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Electrician
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What your suggesting does not meet code. All junctions need to be in the box.

Two options
If your new light has a cord end you can install a receptacle with the existing wire and plug it in.

Most lights allow you to enter the back of the fixture with the wire than make the joints in the light.
 

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Did all the lights tubes in the fixture stop working at once? If so, the ballast went bad. Get ballast-bypass LED tubes from Menards, Home Depot, or Lowes, remove the ballast, install LED tubes and be done with it.
 

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Remove the cable from the old light. Move the cable over to the new light. No need to reinvent the wheel.
 

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Usually Confused
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We've actually spoken on here before...

But either way -- I'm no electrician -- but I am not completely daft.

Step One:
Shut the breaker

I'm talking about a simple little 2 foot strip light.
Something like the one in the photo.


Then - rather than try and snake the wire down to the switch box -- and reconnect it there --

I wanted to just snip both wires so that and twist the new one to the old one and then use velcro to put the new light up.

Nothing fancy - it's the top pf a pantry closet.

I guess what you're telling me is you think it's a bad idea.

Now I also think your intended new fixture has a plug cord (either than or I totally confused). If so, against Code and bad idea.


If no plug cord and there is Romex running to the light- typical house cable - looks something like this:





Then simply connect it to the lamp's wiring inside the fixture. Any that I know of have a 'knock-out' on the back surface. Some seem to come with a plastic ring to protect the wire from the metal edge and that somebody has determined to be compliant, otherwise you would a box connector.


Or you could post some pictures so we can stop guessing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Appreciate all the responses -- I won't doing anything at all until the weekend -- so let me get back to you once I go to Home Depot.

I do understand what you are saying about non-code and dangerous etc -- I am just exploring my options for now...

Once I get to the store this weekend I'll be back to continue the discussion.

Thank you all for your honest and candid replies!
 

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Knows Enough to be Danger
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Shouldn't the existing light already have a box behind it?

This should be basic Electrician 101 type of work. Remove old light, wire in new light. Easy peazy.

But something sounds weird here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ended up going to home depot and buying a hard wired 2 foot strip light.

I shut the breaker -- snipped the old light wire. Then cleaned up the wires coming out of the wall and exposed them better -- attached to new fixture.

Works perfectly.

The mistake I made was not realizing [d'oh] that all I needed to do was just buy a hard-wired light kit rather than one with a plug and start snipping and wire nutting.

Anyway -- thanks for the help from all!
 
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