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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Guys -

Some basic questions on using Sherwin-Williams ProClassic acrylic latex (semi-gloss) for wood trim.

- Brushing previously primed, installed, ~ 2 1/4" wood trim baseboards and standard size door jambs. I know it is not the easiest paint for beginners. What size brush is recommended? I feel like I'm having a difficult time controlling a 2" brush well, yet going to a 1 1/2 and painting door jambs in sections left brush marks/go too slow.

- How well does this stuff self-level? (Asking this question in particular because I know you need to move rather quickly and when I lay on the paint and brush it a few strokes I think "Yeah, I know it's self-leveling but there's NO way it will level THAT much" and I overwork it. Aggravating.)

- If you use FloTrol to extend the working time, does the FloTrol change the color any (using un-tinted 'Extra White')?

- I've airless-sprayed SW Pro-Classic with great results. In my opinion, SW Pro-Classic is harder to brush than spray. Any thoughts on that?

Gotta hand to the real pro's out there: it ain't as easy as it looks, that is, if you care about doing an excellent job.

Thx in advance!
 

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Guys -

Some basic questions on using Sherwin-Williams ProClassic acrylic latex (semi-gloss) for wood trim.

- Brushing previously primed, installed, ~ 2 1/4" wood trim baseboards and standard size door jambs. I know it is not the easiest paint for beginners. What size brush is recommended? I feel like I'm having a difficult time controlling a 2" brush well, yet going to a 1 1/2 and painting door jambs in sections left brush marks/go too slow.

- How well does this stuff self-level? (Asking this question in particular because I know you need to move rather quickly and when I lay on the paint and brush it a few strokes I think "Yeah, I know it's self-leveling but there's NO way it will level THAT much" and I overwork it. Aggravating.)

- If you use FloTrol to extend the working time, does the FloTrol change the color any (using un-tinted 'Extra White')?

- I've airless-sprayed SW Pro-Classic with great results. In my opinion, SW Pro-Classic is harder to brush than spray. Any thoughts on that?

Gotta hand to the real pro's out there: it ain't as easy as it looks, that is, if you care about doing an excellent job.

Thx in advance!
Get a QUALITY 2 1/2 in brush
It levels well if you get enough paint on to begin with
I don't use flotrol
I don't spray
 

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Guys -

Some basic questions on using Sherwin-Williams ProClassic acrylic latex (semi-gloss) for wood trim.

- Brushing previously primed, installed, ~ 2 1/4" wood trim baseboards and standard size door jambs. I know it is not the easiest paint for beginners. What size brush is recommended? I feel like I'm having a difficult time controlling a 2" brush well, yet going to a 1 1/2 and painting door jambs in sections left brush marks/go too slow.

- How well does this stuff self-level? (Asking this question in particular because I know you need to move rather quickly and when I lay on the paint and brush it a few strokes I think "Yeah, I know it's self-leveling but there's NO way it will level THAT much" and I overwork it. Aggravating.)

- If you use FloTrol to extend the working time, does the FloTrol change the color any (using un-tinted 'Extra White')?

- I've airless-sprayed SW Pro-Classic with great results. In my opinion, SW Pro-Classic is harder to brush than spray. Any thoughts on that?

Gotta hand to the real pro's out there: it ain't as easy as it looks, that is, if you care about doing an excellent job.

Thx in advance!
If your having trouble with the 2" brush I wouldn't suggest a bigger one.

And yes a "few" brushstrokes sounds like your overworking it. See PM I sent it may help.

It self levels very well.

Floral will not change the color but it will effect the self levelers that are in the paint. If you feel it needs to be thinned I would recommend a little water.

I usually use advance for spray and PC for brushing.

Another thing about PC is it tends to run and sag pretty easy thinning will add to this problem. so using thin coats is better.
 

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One tip with the ProClassic is work in smaller sections. If you're cutting in SuperPaint at the top of a wall, you can go 3 feet without lifting the brush. With the ProClassic on baseboard, cut that down to 6 inches. The wet edge stays a lot fresher if you are moving it 6 times as often.

A second coat helps too. If you are planning to do 2 coats anyway, you don't feel the temptation to make it perfect the first time. So you don't futz with it too much.
 

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One tip with the ProClassic is work in smaller sections. If you're cutting in SuperPaint at the top of a wall, you can go 3 feet without lifting the brush. With the ProClassic on baseboard, cut that down to 6 inches. The wet edge stays a lot fresher if you are moving it 6 times as often.

A second coat helps too. If you are planning to do 2 coats anyway, you don't feel the temptation to make it perfect the first time. So you don't futz with it too much.
why? As in... why would someone put up with this? This is taking a LOT of time and money out of a professionals pocket. I can see a diy'er who isn't paying themselves not caring, but a pro is losing a lot of labor to mess with something this much. Just wondering.
 

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why? As in... why would someone put up with this? This is taking a LOT of time and money out of a professionals pocket. I can see a diy'er who isn't paying themselves not caring, but a pro is losing a lot of labor to mess with something this much. Just wondering.
I was comparing cutting a ceiling to painting a baseboard, which isn't really a fair comparison. I was just trying to make the point. In reality, you'll never have enough paint on one brush to paint 3 feet of baseboard - no matter what kind of paint you're using.

Painting baseboard is a little tedious and it's tempting for a DIYer to slap that 3 foot long stripe of paint down the middle. You feel like you're accomplishing something. But that takes time. Then you have to get more paint which takes even more time. Then cutting the edges. That's when the wet edge starts to get stale.

One fat rectangle of paint is better than 3 long skinny stripes of paint. But it doesn't take any more time.

This is true for all paints, but the ProClassic is particularly fussy. Being a quasi professional painter, I do about a foot of baseboard at a time regardless of the type of paint because that's what the brush can hold.
 

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IMO, I'm not really sure why you'd use ProClassic acrylic to begin with. I could be wrong, but for me personally if I need really top results, I'm going to use either an oil or a waterborne alkyd. (Remember that ProClassic comes in all 3 versions.) If I'm not going to use the waterborne alkyd, then I'm going to be using SuperPaint instead for the convenience and coverage. You can get good results with SuperPaint if not high end results.

If people are finding ProClassic acrylic to fussy, then what's the point? You're losing the high end finish and you're still putting up with fussy.
 

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I know this isn't an "I hate this product site," and you've already bought the paint, but I can't help myself.

It's not just you. PC acrylic is just hard to use. Sherwin's scientists have managed to make a product that is simultaneously too thick to brush, and too runny to stay put; a product that sets up in seconds, punishing the slightest overwork with horrible brush marks, yet will continue to move on you long past the point where you can do anything about it. For all this hassle, the appearance and characteristics of the final product are nothing special. It's not particularly durable, not particularly high-hiding, not particularly adhesive, and its block resistance is unexceptional. It's not bad, but it's not particularly good, either.
Rant off.

Is the trim you're painting the factory-primed stuff? If so, you should sand and prime it before painting. Some factory primer is such low quality you can wipe it off with a wet paper towel, and the wood often has rough spots that be glaringly obvious once there's glossy paint on them.
 

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I was comparing cutting a ceiling to painting a baseboard, which isn't really a fair comparison. I was just trying to make the point. In reality, you'll never have enough paint on one brush to paint 3 feet of baseboard - no matter what kind of paint you're using.

Painting baseboard is a little tedious and it's tempting for a DIYer to slap that 3 foot long stripe of paint down the middle. You feel like you're accomplishing something. But that takes time. Then you have to get more paint which takes even more time. Then cutting the edges. That's when the wet edge starts to get stale.

One fat rectangle of paint is better than 3 long skinny stripes of paint. But it doesn't take any more time.

This is true for all paints, but the ProClassic is particularly fussy. Being a quasi professional painter, I do about a foot of baseboard at a time regardless of the type of paint because that's what the brush can hold.
Fair enough. I guess diy'ers really should be taking their time and not dry brushing their trim.
 

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I know this isn't an "I hate this product site," and you've already bought the paint, but I can't help myself.

It's not just you. PC acrylic is just hard to use. Sherwin's scientists have managed to make a product that is simultaneously too thick to brush, and too runny to stay put; a product that sets up in seconds, punishing the slightest overwork with horrible brush marks, yet will continue to move on you long past the point where you can do anything about it. For all this hassle, the appearance and characteristics of the final product are nothing special. It's not particularly durable, not particularly high-hiding, not particularly adhesive, and its block resistance is unexceptional. It's not bad, but it's not particularly good, either.
Rant off.

Is the trim you're painting the factory-primed stuff? If so, you should sand and prime it before painting. Some factory primer is such low quality you can wipe it off with a wet paper towel, and the wood often has rough spots that be glaringly obvious once there's glossy paint on them.
I can't add anything to this. I'm speechless I guess.
 

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Thanks, klaatu. In my limited experience as a DIYer, if you want it to look really good, use Advance. If you don't have time to wait around for Advance, use Manor Hall, which gives a nicer, if somewhat glossier, finish than PC, while also being easier to use, more adhesive, and drying to a much harder finish with very quick block resistance (kind of smelly, though). If neither is an option for whatever reason, Behr Premium Plus or Behr Ultra with a bit of water or XIM match PC's performance while being vastly easier to use and costing a lot less.
 

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If nothing else, this thread points to a bit of a gap in the painting line-up of many paint companies............there just isn't a whole lot out there for fine finishing of woodwork to get that nice glossy or semi-glossy finish that's 1) reasonably priced, and 2) is easy to work with.

PC is difficult to work with, but once you figure out the nuances, it does produce a nice finish. I've done boatloads of kitchen cabinet work using PC and rarely have I had callbacks about runs, durability, hardness, etc. I warn everyone up front though that painting cabinets that are oak with a clear coat on them that you will have occasional yearly touch-ups from doors banging, kids running toys into them, etc. but that's to be expected, I guess, with any painted surface.
 
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Take my word for it Advance is no piece of cake to brush the first couple times you use it either. As I said before I like PC for brush, Advance for spray, but both have their quirks. And Behr on trim I tried that a couple times NO THANKS.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Guys -

MANY thanks for all your replies. I read them days ago and I promise, I do appreciate all your advice. There's a lot going on in my life now so I'm limited in my time to reply. I will fully admit that I recognize I am the cause of my own problems. I'm a DIY-er remodeling my own home because I got tired of the "professionals" in my area simply not caring about doing a good job. Where I live is 100 miles away from decent sized cities and most (no, not all, but "most") tradesmen in this town know you are a captive customer and just don't care about treating customers well. I got sick of it and said I can do at least as good a job as they do. So, I'm learning as I go.

As far as painting trim by brush, I'd never done it before. I'd only sprayed, using SW ProClassic, which is why I'm using it on the trim I'm brushing now. In an attempt to not lose control of the paint I chose to use a smaller brush and brush the baseboards, door trim and wood in between the door trim (the casing?) in smaller sections in a small closet. The baseboards turned out ok because I was able to move a little faster (I previously inserted metal strips below the baseboard to protect the carpet). The closet doorway: I first painted ONLY the door trim on the inside of the closet, then after letting it dry I painted the door casing but only 1/2 of it (laterally) by painting only as wide from the door trim edge over to & including the 'door stop' (?") pieces, i.e., the 1/2" x 1" molded piece in the center of the door casing that the door physically touches when the door is closed. I did this with a Purdy 1 1/2" angled nylon & polyester brush and then tried a 2" Purdy angled nylon & polyester brush.

I can see I caused my own problems (brush strokes) by simply going too slow and overworking the SW PC paint. To me, other than the brush strokes, this SW PC looks GREAT! It has a nice sheen, a crisp white color and subtly shows the wood grain (which I like). It's not the paint's fault, it's mine and I would love to learn how to brush it like a professional. I know I have to use more paint, move faster and not overwork it and just trust that it WILL level out!

Having said that....when doing trim, do most of you professionals (or even you experienced DIYers) like using angled brushes on trim and doorways or do you prefer to use a straight-tipped brush?

I can see the advantage of an angled sash brush on baseboards but what about on the door trim, etc?

(BTW, special thanks to ToolSeeker, Chrisn, mathmonger and Gymschu for all your specific advice.)
 

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I don't think I have ever purchased anything other than an angled brush for interior work. The 2 1/2" is my "go-to" brush for just about everything. Twister, if you can conquer PC, you can conquer just about any paint!
 

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Take my word for it Advance is no piece of cake to brush the first couple times you use it either. As I said before I like PC for brush, Advance for spray, but both have their quirks. And Behr on trim I tried that a couple times NO THANKS.
Toolseeker, let's remember to talk actual paint, not just brand. You're mixing apples and oranges by mentioning Advance, PC, then Behr. Behr isn't an actual paint.

I've used Behr Ultra semi-gloss on trim. While I like Ultra on walls, I didn't find the coverage to be good enough to make it worth my while to switch from Advance or PC. If I want a high end finish, I don't mind dealing with sags and runs to get it. If I don't need it, then I want good coverage (like one coat with SuperPaint). Ultra didn't fit into either of those categories so I won't try it again unless I hear the formula changes.
 
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