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A very interesting link! Thanks!

In 1978, I built an attached garage on a concrete slab! At the time it seemed to me, to be a good idea to lay down 6 mil plastic sheeting, immediately under the slab and I have been well pleased with its performance!
The floor has been perfectly dry and has never cracked, even though the garage is unheated and has experienced temperatures ranging from 0F to 90F.
the fact that it is unheated contributes to why it still is working.
 

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that range of temperatures indicate random crk'ing should've been expected,,, hi temps cause conc to expend & cold the exact opposite however good jointing patterns usually prevent random crk'ing,,, its just good practice to place vapor barrier under conc for most instances,,, in fact, engineers're spec'ing 15mil more & more.

can't speak to ' foam ' on conc - only miradrain/delta drain/sonnedrain ( generic )
 

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the fact that it is unheated contributes to why it still is working.
There is more to the story though! I excavated the perimeter, down 16" and built a retaining form from 2, 2X8's. Inside the form I ran reinforcing and rolled out mesh reinforcing over the whole area!
The attached garage was 16X28 with a heated utility area at one end only!
 

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I was referring more to the fact of moisture problems not as evident in an unheated space. This means the change in temperature is less then pressure difference is less thus less moisture transfer and much less a chance of condensation.
 

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I was referring more to the fact of moisture problems not as evident in an unheated space. This means the change in temperature is less then pressure difference is less thus less moisture transfer and much less a chance of condensation.
Ah so! That makes sense, as it is sitting on a block of ice for 4/5 months!
 

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The one I was referring to was in a basement. He put the XPS foam directly on the concrete then the plywood and then screwed it to the floor.




Do you have a brand name for the dimpled plastic?

Also do I attach the plastic first to the concrete floor then attach the foam and plywood to the floor through the dimpled plastic?
I did some research. I think that dimpled plastic stuff is called Delta FL (http://www.cosella-dorken.com/bvf-ca-en/products/foundation_residential/floor/products/fl.php). On HoH, he laid it down, taped the overlapping seams, layed down the t&g subfloor, and screwed it all down together with concrete screws.

Do you remember which episode that was (episode name or #)? I'm curious to see for myself what he did.
 

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There is option #4! Dimpled plastic, 1" foam and 5/8" t/g subfloor!
That's a good idea. The dimple plastic looks like it only provides vapor/moisture barrier, but not insulation. Downside is that the floor will now be just as high as using sleeper floor setup.
 

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I did some research. I think that dimpled plastic stuff is called Delta FL (http://www.cosella-dorken.com/bvf-ca-en/products/foundation_residential/floor/products/fl.php). On HoH, he laid it down, taped the overlapping seams, layed down the t&g subfloor, and screwed it all down together with concrete screws.

Do you remember which episode that was (episode name or #)? I'm curious to see for myself what he did.
Hey, thats an interesting product! Its distributed here where I live and it may very well be the answer to my situation!
It appears that laminate flooring can be laid directly over it!
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I am working on solving the water issues, sump pump, gutters draining into 4 inch pipes under ground and pipe running 100 feet away from house. Sealing cracks in floor, looking at drains around the sides of the house.

But also want to do what is the best on the inside of the house. I'm leaning toward the 6ml vapor barrier, maybe put down twice in opposite direction, the 3/4 inch XPS pink rigid foam board them 5/8 plywood over that. Is the 5/8 the thinnest that is recommended?

Water was never an issue before, but I dont want water issue again and just because this was a 100 year storm, doesn't mean its going to wait another 100 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Just to make sure I understand the insulation rigid board I should use on the floor

Dow 1/2" x 8' x 4' R-3.3 Polyisocyanurate Rigid Foam Insulated Sheathing is not the correct stuff right even though it has moisture resistant facers?
 

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Just to make sure I understand the insulation rigid board I should use on the floor

Dow 1/2" x 8' x 4' R-3.3 Polyisocyanurate Rigid Foam Insulated Sheathing is not the correct stuff right even though it has moisture resistant facers?
Sorry, but I have absolutely no knowledge about any form of rigid foam insulation.
Unless, someone comes forward, you are on your own!
Then, you will be our resident expert on foam insulation! :huh:
 

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if i'm thinking about the same episode of holmes on homes that you are referring to, the foam padding has dimples as well. He describes it as egg carton for drainage and breathability. Here's a snapshot of it. Is this what you were thinking?

did you ever find out what it was called?
 
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