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Hi all,

Coming along on finishing my basement. I built a 2x6, 4' x 6' half wall to separate the rooms. I drove the bottom plate into the concrete with ramset 2.5" nails and added some blocking to secure the wall to the entire wall. The wall is sturdy but still has some give to it. Any suggestions on how i can make it sturdier?

Thanks! :thumbsup:
 

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Hi all,

Coming along on finishing my basement. I built a 2x6, 4' x 6' half wall to separate the rooms. I drove the bottom plate into the concrete with ramset 2.5" nails and added some blocking to secure the wall to the entire wall. The wall is sturdy but still has some give to it. Any suggestions on how i can make it sturdier?

Thanks! :thumbsup:
I built a column floor to ceiling for my stair rail / banister and it's very sturdy.
 

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I would have used long decking screws to build it, constution adhesive under the bottom plate, used Tap Cons not a Ram Set and added at least one more short 2 X 6 on the left side where it meets the wall.
 

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Hopefully the bottom plate is PT lumber.?
Toenail screws on each side of the studs ( 1-1/2" side) down into the bottom plate. Sister the end stud with two more.
Installing the drywall will also add strength.

NOTE: be sure to secure the bottom plate good.
 

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I did this on two occasions and didn't want a column. Each time built two half walls sixteen inches apart. Tied the walls together. First one made shelves for storage with a top. Second, just made a serving wall. Divides the room, looks great and is sturdy
 

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In order to stiffen that wall:

1. Run a diagonal brace from the top of the open side to the bottom of the secured side.

2. Sheathe one side or both sides with 1/2" ply or osb.

If the bottom is secured, and it is secured to the existing walls, the bracing and the sheathing (sheathing is the same as bracing) will take all the waggle out of it.
 

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Ramsets are fine, put TWO in each joist bay, one an inch in from one side width wise and the second an inch from the other side to keep it from flopping back and forth. As mentioned, sheathing, either
Y or drywall will add a lot of stability. Ron.
 

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assuming the bottom plate is tight to the floor and not wiggling.
Remove the 2nd last stud. install a 3.25" wide L bracket with 12" legs.
Usually the flex is between the plate and the bottom of the stud. This takes care of that.
 

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As others have said, and I'll add some more, it needs a rock solid anchor, and 1" nails in concrete are not going to work.
I'd redesign it with a cabinet or sink a post into the slab.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you all for your suggestions. Would putting some horizontal 2x6's between the studs help too?
 

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Not really.
Where does it wiggle now?
As mentioned, adhesive to floor, proper nailing, 1/2" plywood both sides, or my metal bracket idea.
 

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In order to stiffen that wall:

1. Run a diagonal brace from the top of the open side to the bottom of the secured side.

2. Sheathe one side or both sides with 1/2" ply or osb.

If the bottom is secured, and it is secured to the existing walls, the bracing and the sheathing (sheathing is the same as bracing) will take all the waggle out of it.
This is a tried and true method--clad the framing with plywood--:)
 

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In order to stiffen that wall:

1. Run a diagonal brace from the top of the open side to the bottom of the secured side.

2. Sheathe one side or both sides with 1/2" ply or osb.

If the bottom is secured, and it is secured to the existing walls, the bracing and the sheathing (sheathing is the same as bracing) will take all the waggle out of it.
I doubt that will be the direction of the worst movement. In my experience the top of the open end will move 90° to the wall length which sheathing and diagonals will do very little to over come that. But if it would that would sure be a simple solution.
 

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here is my overkill solution. At the end of the wall minus about a inch drill a 9/16 hole thru the lumber and into the concrete 4". Also drill a 1/2 hole directly above in the top board. Fill the concrete hole with anchor epoxy and insert 1/2 -13 threaded rod long enough to reach thru the top. After it cures, flat washer, tighten nut and cut off flush.
make another top board with counter bore to conceal nut. We will be 1.5'' taller but not sure there would be enough meat to just counter bore the top board.
 

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here is my overkill solution. At the end of the wall minus about a inch drill a 9/16 hole thru the lumber and into the concrete 4". Also drill a 1/2 hole directly above in the top board. Fill the concrete hole with anchor epoxy and insert 1/2 -13 threaded rod long enough to reach thru the top. After it cures, flat washer, tighten nut and cut off flush.
make another top board with counter bore to conceal nut. We will be 1.5'' taller but not sure there would be enough meat to just counter bore the top board.
He said the bottom plate is tight to the floor.
Where you will have a problem is between the studs and plate,like somebody else said take an L bracket and put it on the stud and bottom plate..glue and put a lot of screws in drywall too
 

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He said the bottom plate is tight to the floor.
Where you will have a problem is between the studs and plate,like somebody else said take an L bracket and put it on the stud and bottom plate..glue and put a lot of screws in drywall too

Scott the threaded rod reaches from the concrete all the way to the top of the top plate. This one fastener will compress all the slop out of the end stud and plate connections as well as draw down the bottom plate in that area.


But I also think the L bracket and some of the other ideas are workable too.
 

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I have used the L bracket idea - it works well. Although I have had to custom make the L bracket out of 3" strap steel.
The Plywood on both sides method works also if you do not mid the wider wall. and is easy to get and do.
The threaded rod method I have heard of before, makes sense. May be a little harder to do now though. Although not a big deal.
 

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I did this on two occasions and didn't want a column. Each time built two half walls sixteen inches apart. Tied the walls together. First one made shelves for storage with a top. Second, just made a serving wall. Divides the room, looks great and is sturdy
Other than a column this method in my opinion is one of the few that will stand the test of time and more counter top is usually very welcome especially with storage below.
 

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or bring in a couple base cabinets and call it a peninsula, or a couple wall cabinets on a base and have a bar :thumbup:

see what happens when you ask a bunch of guys how to tighten up a board, they'll want you to re-pupose and re-design the whole room :no:
 
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