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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

I hired a plumber to install my new tub for my bathroom remodel and he shimmed the tub on the sides in order to secure it to the studs (pictures below). These spaces (and shims) are all different widths - 1/2", 5/8th", 1", etc. I'm going to be installing 1/2" hardieboard but if I do so as is, the boards will not align with the tub flange. Should I unscrew the tub sides, remove the shims, put in the board and shim behind the backerboard till flush? Should I trim the shim tops and install the board over them? This would still leave a 1/2" gap in some spots. Bullnose? And if I trim them, what do you recommend for the gaps on the front lower sides of the tub?

I can't be the first person dealing with this type of situation... any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well ...yes and that's why I am here. I'm assuming I need to fur out the walls so I don't end up with slanted backerboard, but that will still leave a gap to the floor. Additionally, does the backerboard go over the tub flange or flush with it? Anyone know?
 

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retired framer
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You also need a block at the end to the tub to attach the backer
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I wouldn’t mess with moving the tub at this point.

At this point I would sister on to all the studs to bring them in line with the top of your flange (Or slightly forward if you drop your board over the flange like I do)

You will have to do it to the three walls - all the way across the tub head wall and tub foot wall (As well as the tub back wall).

You could just sister the studs in the tub alcove but then you have a bump - which I advise against.

it will be a pain but at least you will have flat plumb walls. Use a string line to get all the studs in plane.

In my old 100 year old condo many of the studs were not in plane. I think the old timers didn’t worry too much about in-plane walls since they were going to float the walls anyway - though I did find some studs straightened with the slice and wedge trick.

personally, I prefer to drop the backer board down over the flange. I don’t like have a potential seam even though it’s behind the tile. My way works better at the head and foot of the tub flange where water always seems to get at the drywall where the flange ends. I use a 1/4 inch shim to hold the board off the tub while I fasten it.
 

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Well ...yes and that's why I am here. I'm assuming I need to fur out the walls so I don't end up with slanted backerboard, but that will still leave a gap to the floor. Additionally, does the backerboard go over the tub flange or flush with it? Anyone know?
Flush with the back of it.
 

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Is it equally spaced from the wall to the tub? The reason I ask is, if the framed area was square, is the tub oriented parallel to the main wall or is it off angle a little bit? I wonder what the reasoning is for it to be spaced that far off of the stud wall
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Is it equally spaced from the wall to the tub? The reason I ask is, if the framed area was square, is the tub oriented parallel to the main wall or is it off angle a little bit? I wonder what the reasoning is for it to be spaced that far off of the stud wall
Strangely enough, it is not. This house is only 10 years old but there are a lot of weird little things like this I'm finding. That 60" back wall behind the tub is actually a false wall. It's been measured and there is, we're guessing, a 6 to 8" gap between that false wall and the exterior wall on the other side. My money is on a body being back there, but others have guessed it's stuffed full of cash! (I wish)
 
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