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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all,

i am using 80x80mm wood stud and i am using 625mm spacing for my vertical studs, what is the maximum spacing i can have for my horizontal? using 1250x2500x12.5mm plasterboard. partition wall

any help? thanks
 

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hi all,

i am using 80x80mm wood stud and i am using 625mm spacing for my vertical studs, what is the maximum spacing i can have for my horizontal? using 1250x2500x12.5mm plasterboard. partition wall

any help? thanks
Why do you need horizontal framing?
For 24" spacing, I'd use a 5/8" drywall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i am working in switzerland. the plasterboard is the biggest and thickest available. the stud size i am using is to keep the wall as thin/strong as possible. the pine stud we use warps quite a bit. the horizontal bracing between the long vertical suds is to increase rigidity and stop further twisting..
i was just wondering if i was going to put 3 or 2 staggard lines of horizontal bracing, if there was some equation or regulation that i had to adhere to over an area size for the plasterboard. not trying to stretch limits, just dealing with different products.
 

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Tileguy
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i am working in switzerland.
Jheeze !!!

I wouldn't think it mattered if the structure the board is being attached to is vertical or horizontal the minimum spacing requirement would be the same in either direction. Certainly not more than 24" apart, and that's stretching it IMHO.:) Have no idea how things are done in Switzerland.
 

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To compensate for the 24" vertical framing, I'd use about a 16" spacing. Since the plasterboards are about 49", I'd break it into 1/3's. At 16, 32 and 49".
 

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They do not build everywhere the same as the U.S. - I do not know specifically about Switzerland, but in many areas they build for sound and stiffness since masonry is the things are based on for end performance. I have seen horizontal firring for creating a better wall surface, especially with a flimsey 3x3 stud instead of the traditional clay or concrete units.

In many countries they have a bigger challenge with wood floors that do not feel secure and transmit sound. - Low cost construction where they usually build long term buildings. The tradition is for solid, fireproof and durable walls that are not too thick. In some countries, they use 3" or 4" clay tile, route out a chase with a hammer for electrical, patch with mortar and then plaster both sides with two coats (economical, traditional and proven).

Thin wood is common because it is looked at as just a cheap material to be used in combination.

Dick
 
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