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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My son is looking at a new home construction, but in the attic there are several supports propped up with platforms, wooden boxes or a simple wooden I-beam section as shown in the attachment. Is this structurally sound?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just got a copy of the architect's plans and they actually show these posts as part of the design. I doubt the architect expected them to be sitting on pieces of I-beam...., wondering if the builder replaces with solid beams from rafter to header, would it be safe. Will be getting a structural engineer to review it.
 

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Welcome to the forums!

Let us know what the SE says as those valley rafters should probably be larger to self-support. OTOH, if in design, I hope there is blocking in the attic floor joists... BTW, that is a strongback, not an I-joist, used to distribute loads. Though the deck sheathing does appear to be sagging there... Straighten the kink in the HVAC flex ducting (near right post) as it will restrict quantity; http://rockwallcontrols.com/Residential/?tag=air-ducting

http://oaktrust.library.tamu.edu/bitstream/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-2011-12-10460/WEAVER-THESIS.pdf

Gary
 

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Just got a copy of the architect's plans and they actually show these posts as part of the design. I doubt the architect expected them to be sitting on pieces of I-beam...., wondering if the builder replaces with solid beams from rafter to header, would it be safe. Will be getting a structural engineer to review it.
Architect's make it pretty, engineers make it stand up. From the one pic, it is hard to see what is going on. Low pitch roof, dormer in front, looks to be area over Garage???
It would be interesting to see what the engineer opines, but if this is a new home build, ask the builder how many of this model he has built and how long he has been building them. I assume you will have the engineer go to the home to inspect, and not just look at the plans. Many as builts to comply with plans becasue the builder makes field changes.
 

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if the plans show those cross beams with posts they need to be there what concerns me is there is no kingstud or other similar design to keep the beams from tipping sideways in a seismic, wind or, other vibration inducing event.
 

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This looks like poor framing practice at best. Certainly bizarre for new house construction. Posts need to be positively connected to framing members on both top and bottom, preferably using special steel brackets such as the type made by Simpson. Propping up a post using an I beam or similar will not work during impact events, seismic, or high wind events, as the post is likely to detach from the framing members.
 

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what is the approval process and inspection process in your area?
I am not qualified to comment on your picture but I am curious about the process. In my area if those were in the architects plans they would have either been approved or rejected in the planning stages by the building department. Then when the rough carpentry inspection happened they would have either been approved for a second time or rejected by an inspector.
 

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Personally I wouldn't even consider that house after seeing this. I could understand if it was old construction - but no excuse for a new home. Just imagine the things you can't see! Not trying to scare you away but that's how I would feel if I was buying a brand new home. Similar to buying a new car and seeing the spare tire already on it...
 

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If you're that worried, it's time to go hire an engineer. A good carpenter will know as well. But one photo or even 1000 photos will not be as good as site inspection, esp since photo is biased by what YOU think is important.
However the braces are used, it works if it can transfer the load and the next load bearing point can support it. Pros often do things that are not pretty or intuitive to the novice. The valley beam looks like at least 2x12 and the roof joists looks at least a dimension less-meaning load bearing beams look like load bearing beams.
If the inspector wants to remove some insulation to confirm, ok. Easily replaced with can foam.
Novice's intuition can be right too. If this is a house on the market, and you're that worried, strongly recommend walking away.
 

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Someone probably name this sort of situation. If a child under 10 can look at something like this and point out it does not look right, you should look for the closest exit and run.
The other posters are light years ahead of me in knowledge, but I just have to ask, what the hell is that crap? Are you serious?
 
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