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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was wondering which Peel Away product to use to strip the (almost certainly lead-based) paint off of a plaster wall (approx. 80 sq ft total) after removing wainscotting. The first picture shows the wall, I was thinking to scrape whatever I can scrape off (wainscotting adhesive and detached paint) and then apply Peel Away.

A few years ago, I used Peel Away 1 to remove some stubborn old paint off of a brick wall in my basement because I wanted to have an exposed brick wall. The second picture attached is showing a circle with Peel Away 1 applied as a test before I proceeded with the rest and the old paint around (so the circle was just like the rest before I applied Peel Away 1 to it).

Peel Away 1 did an EXCELLENT job on brick, however, I am wondering if it may weaken plaster, i.e. if it is applicable here or if I should use another Peel Away product.

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Am, will Peel remove that adhesive? Why have you not considered scraping what you can and just skim coating the walls? That would appear to be the least complicated effort. You mentioned lead, but lead is completely neutral as long as it's not peeling off in chips or moveable parts are not generating dust. Once it's skimmed over and painted and is sound there are zero health effects.

I responded to this before I read your other thread. Double dipping huh? Guess I agree with the consensus on the other thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Am, will Peel remove that adhesive? Why have you not considered scraping what you can and just skim coating the walls?
I said "I was thinking to scrape whatever I can scrape off (wainscotting adhesive and detached paint) and then apply Peel Away." So the Peel Away would only act against the leftover paint. Because there are so many coats of paint, just mechanically removing and repainting would look ugly.

From my previous experience, I think Peel Away is fairly simple. What scares me is needing to mechanically scrape off the old paint, which would be near impossible and certainly not be done without compromising the plaster substrate.
 

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I said "I was thinking to scrape whatever I can scrape off (wainscotting adhesive and detached paint) and then apply Peel Away." So the Peel Away would only act against the leftover paint. Because there are so many coats of paint, just mechanically removing and repainting would look ugly.

From my previous experience, I think Peel Away is fairly simple. What scares me is needing to mechanically scrape off the old paint, which would be near impossible and certainly not be done without compromising the plaster substrate.[/quote]


Whatever you do, you are going to compromise the plaster. I think you would be better off doing it mechanically but what the heck do us painters know with probably 150 years of experience between us? You came asking a question and got answers and made up your'e mind. Use the stripper:whistling2:
 

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Am, we're thinking along different lines here by the nature of our backgrounds. As a painter I would think of Peel Away for only two reasons, basically: to return a surface to its substrate look, like your brick wall, or if the paint system is failed down to the substrate, complete system failure, as on an old neglected house. Another use might be if old trim has been scraped and repainted over decades and looks akin to the contour of the dark side of the moon, but that's for an aesthetic reason and stripping is far more realistic than patching.

With what you have the thoughts of Peel wouldn't even come to mind. I wouldn't consider anything other than scraping the bulk of the adhesive off, using a sealing primer to lock it all down, applying a couple of skim coats, sanding and priming, and then two coats of finish. I've seen what you have, and worse, and the recommendations you're getting are so because that's what we would do in that situation. What type of Peel you would use and what effect it would have are as much as mystery to me as you, and if I were contemplating that usage I would be on the phone with Peel asking them what they thought. My purpose in life is to not make it any harder on me than it has to be.
 

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Am, we're thinking along different lines here by the nature of our backgrounds. As a painter I would think of Peel Away for only two reasons, basically: to return a surface to its substrate look, like your brick wall, or if the paint system is failed down to the substrate, complete system failure, as on an old neglected house. Another use might be if old trim has been scraped and repainted over decades and looks akin to the contour of the dark side of the moon, but that's for an aesthetic reason and stripping is far more realistic than patching.

With what you have the thoughts of Peel wouldn't even come to mind. I wouldn't consider anything other than scraping the bulk of the adhesive off, using a sealing primer to lock it all down, applying a couple of skim coats, sanding and priming, and then two coats of finish. I've seen what you have, and worse, and the recommendations you're getting are so because that's what we would do in that situation. What type of Peel you would use and what effect it would have are as much as mystery to me as you, and if I were contemplating that usage I would be on the phone with Peel asking them what they thought. My purpose in life is to not make it any harder on me than it has to be.

You are just so much more eloquent than I:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Glue is the least of the problem. Perhaps the picture doesn't do justice. The biggest problem is that different numbers of layers of paint have been peeled off when I ripped the wainscotting (they just kept painting over throughout the decades) and i want to remove it all down to the substrate, as the lowest common denominator across the unevennesses of the whole wall.

I certainly don't wanna d**k around with trying to fill each and every unevenness in paint. I want to simulate a brand new wall for painting scenario rather than a patch existing scenario because the latter is always PIA.
 

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Peelaway 1 is a caustic-based paint and varnish remover that's really good on detailed surfaces that have been overpainted year on year. It pulls the old paint or varnish out of the detailed areas when you peel away the blanket with the poultice. Far less messy than a traditional stripper and more effective.

The non caustic-based version is Peelaway 7 This works better on more modern acrylic paints and varnishes from the last 25 years or so.

Both products work on metal wood, stone, brick, plaster and more.

There's a video showing how it peelaway works on youtube here.
http://http://www.wood-finishes-direct.com/products/wood-finishes/wood-cleaners/peelaway-one.htm
 
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