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My new tenant in an apartment I rent out texts me and says the fridge doesn't work. I go over and the light in the fridge works and the other thing on the same outlet, the gas stove works but the fridge motor is not on.

I figure the fridge finally crapped out since I bought the place in 2006, so I say I will get a new fridge. She isn't completely moved in yet so there is no food in it and I have a couple days.

Next day she texts me that the stove stopped lighting. I go over and sure, no power at the outlet now. Strange that happens right after the fridge dies, but I think maybe the outlet is bad or the old fridge caused the fuse to blow.

I check the fuse box. They are old Edison style fuses but I have replaced some over the years with the breaker-style button reset Edison fuses. None of the button breakers are pushed out but I reset all of them anyway and individually check all the non-breaker style with my multimeter since you can't always tell if they are blown by looking at them. Nothing is marked well in the fuse panel so I checked every single one.

All fuses are good so I figure I'll be changing the outlet next to eliminate that as the problem.

I go upstairs and the outlet is working, the stove works fine, and the fridge is now running fine and cooling.

What the hell could have happened? I am thinking maybe a fuse wasn't making good contact but was able to pass enough amps to light the light in the fridge buy not run the motor?

All is working now but I need to know what happened as I am sure to have to "fix" it again. Plus, great puzzle, right?
 

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Sounds like a loose connection. A very common cause of this problem is the use of the back stab pushin connections. If any of your receptacles use of these connections move the wires to the screw terminals. The problem could be in any junction box on the circuit even one that has a working device.
 

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Sounds like a loose connection. A very common cause of this problem is the use of the back stab pushin connections. If any of your receptacles use of these connections move the wires to the screw terminals.
Interesting. I didn't know those push-in terminals on outlets are less reliable than screw terminals. So convenient, but if less reliable, I'll avoid them in the future.
 

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Interesting. I didn't know those push-in terminals on outlets are less reliable than screw terminals. So convenient, but if less reliable, I'll avoid them in the future.
The spring-loaded push in connectors are notoriously unreliable. The ones were wired through a hole in the back of the receptacle and you tighten a screw to connect it are very good however. If the ones you have are the type with the spring connections you definitely should replace them.
 

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My house when I moved in (foreclosure) had a 60amp main fuse disconnect.


This idiot that lived here before me found that one of the sides where the fuse plugs in was loose (the clamps would not hold the fuse tightly) so he stuck between the clamp on the top of the one fuse a bolt between the fuse and the clamp that holds the fuse to take up the extra slack of the clamp so the fuse would be held tight. :vs_OMG::vs_laugh::vs_mad::glasses: This clown did other things like no where in the entire house whether it is a receptacle or switch did he use boxes. Just popped a hole in the wall and screwed the switch or receptacle to the wall surface.:surprise:


NOTE: any future DIYer reading this please don't ever do this!!
 
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