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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1940 built lakefront house in Central Mass with a damp basement that needs replacement of a few steel lally columns that have rusted. A friend has suggested pressure treated wood to replace the columns because of the dampness. Thoughts?
 

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Concidered addressing the real issue?
That moisture is effecting everything in the basement, plumbing, wiring connections, any exposed wood, air qualilty in the main house.
A pressure treated 6 X 6 will likly work but it needs a proper footing, a post base that holds it off the concrete and some form of post cap to attach the top.
If not it also is going to rot out.
 

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Doesn't make sense to me, if the steel is rusting quickly, how long do you think wood is going to last. I would stick with a steel replacement, but this time put another pc of 1/2 or 3/4 thick steel plate under the base for separation from the concrete. If the column comes primed only, top coat with a premium paint for metal (Rusto.) especially the base and welds prior to install. Sounds like the basement could probably benefit from a dehumidifier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your replies. We're using a dehumidifier currently and will plan on drying out the basement eventually, but as you all know, that isn't usually a quick fix. We're stressing about the lally columns right now and needed to prioritize. The worst of the lally columns appears to sitting on dirt, so clearly we'll need some footing work also. The friend is a great contractor, so I didn't want to offend him by questioning the recommendation, but it didn't quite make sense either. Would there be ANY benefit of pressure treated wood? He said it would last 100 years and he actually pointed to other wood lally columns in the basement that seemed to be holding up well.
 

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I see no benefit of PT wood over steel lally columns in this application. Steel lally columns have been in use for over a hundred years. Some of them are hollow, some filled with concrete. My basement has steel lally columns that have been in since 1959, and despite two basement floods and a relatively high humidity, they have not rusted significantly. You may want to check to see if all you have is surface rust, which can be scraped off, and the steel painted. As for having no footings, that is a problem that needs to be addressed by installing concrete footings to code, and installing the lally columns with appropriate connections to the footing and the beam above.
 

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Another thought regarding steel vs a treated wooden Post. Both should last a 100 years if kept dry and especially moisture wicking up from the floor.
For about $40 more than a PT post you can buy a properly sized steel adjustable lolly column. And what you get is complete adjustability, easier install with the flanges on top and bottom for direct bolting. No shimming.
And will not shrink or expand with humidity changes.

Using wood requires accurate cutting, a separate jack post to install, mounting brackets for top and bottom and if there is compression or settling may require re-jacking and shimming.

Unless your going for a rustic look finished basement I just don't see the reasoning for using a wood post to hold up the house. (IMHO of course) :wink:

just one of several on the market
http://www.tigerbrandjackpost.com/adjustable-columns.html
 

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Another thought regarding steel vs a treated wooden Post. Both should last a 100 years if kept dry and especially moisture wicking up from the floor.
For about $40 more than a PT post you can buy a properly sized steel adjustable lolly column. And what you get is complete adjustability, easier install with the flanges on top and bottom for direct bolting. No shimming.
And will not shrink or expand with humidity changes.

Using wood requires accurate cutting, a separate jack post to install, mounting brackets for top and bottom and if there is compression or settling may require re-jacking and shimming.

Unless your going for a rustic look finished basement I just don't see the reasoning for using a wood post to hold up the house. (IMHO of course) :wink:

just one of several on the market
http://www.tigerbrandjackpost.com/adjustable-columns.html

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Sure seems to me YODA has the best idea.... if the standard screw post at the BB stores is insufficient, you can order heavuer duty off the internet.... or put in two....MUCH SIMPLER... you still have to put in a footing and pad either way... and if appearance is somehow important (doesn't sound like it) just box it out.

And, if you have had any settling in your beams.... you can jack them slowly/incrementally.

Best
 

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Sure seems to me YODA has the best idea.... if the standard screw post at the BB stores is insufficient, you can order heavuer duty off the internet....

Best
if I need them I call the factory fist and talk with their tech svc to spec the part number correctly. Then call HD who is a dealer to order, takes about 2 weeks to deliver.
 
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