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Installing new doors in an old doorway. The paneling is old, the door is new, the casing is new. The door looks OK, but the pine casing is awful. What's the best way to fix it? Is this oak? Should I redo? With veneer or new lumber? Who carries oak trim? Who sells quarter sawn oak, if quarter sawn is needed? Cost?
 

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My two cents is that different woods will all have different color variations due to the hardness, grain etc. And if you are trying to match paper covered materials like paneling … good luck. I tell a lot of my customers that what they are looking will not matter in a few weeks. Why? Because it all just blends in and you no longer just focus in on that issue that seems to be so outstanding at the moment. With that said just give it a week or two and then look at it and decide if it really matters and needs to be addressed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My two cents is that different woods will all have different color variations due to the hardness, grain etc. And if you are trying to match paper covered materials like paneling … good luck. I tell a lot of my customers that what they are looking will not matter in a few weeks. Why? Because it all just blends in and you no longer just focus in on that issue that seems to be so outstanding at the moment. With that said just give it a week or two and then look at it and decide if it really matters and needs to be addressed.
Yes. It really matters. It needs to be addressed. This is a historic restoration of an important building.
 

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A better picture of the paneling would help---rather looks like cherry--so cherry molding might be needed---more info,please.
 

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then you get the same species of wood. While you can often make one wood look a lot like another, as far as color, you cannot change the grain or density. That means when you have pine stained to mimic something else, it may look great as long as you do not place it so you can make a direct comparison between the pine and the wood you are mimicking.

When you have the work side by side, about all you can do is use matching wood species. Even then you are going to have to work hard to match any stain used (if any) and even the actual finish product used can make a huge difference.



I was thinking the same think as oh mike; maybe cherry. That grain is pretty fine for oak.
 

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Great, then the casing in my option is pine and needs to be replaced no doubt.The door looks maybe Poplar due to greenish tint.
I try to not judge color on the internet. color accuracy varies with different screens let alone myriad other factors but accepting your call;


since this is a historical restoration, the doors need to be replaced too unless the originals were poplar. Historical restorations demand any work done be done as close to the original as possible using as material as close to the original as possible.
 

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Looks like you also did not use a wood conditioner before staining, one reason you get a blotchy finish.
Should have removed the doors or at least taped them off before staining, now your going to have dark areas when you stain the door.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I try to not judge color on the internet. color accuracy varies with different screens let alone myriad other factors but accepting your call;


since this is a historical restoration, the doors need to be replaced too unless the originals were poplar. Historical restorations demand any work done be done as close to the original as possible using as material as close to the original as possible.
The color is less a concern than the grain of the wood, and the way the wood absorbed/resisted the color.

Right now I'm concerned only with the casing. Can you confirm it's supposed to be cherry (wood, not stain?)
 

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Looks like you also did not use a wood conditioner before staining, one reason you get a blotchy finish.
Should have removed the doors or at least taped them off before staining, now your going to have dark areas when you stain the door.
I'm remediating. I'm the fixer. Yep, agree on conditioner. In reference to the areas of pine that resisted the stain, what could help there?
 

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The color is less a concern than the grain of the wood, and the way the wood absorbed/resisted the color.

Right now I'm concerned only with the casing. Can you confirm it's supposed to be cherry (wood, not stain?)

I'm not there. I cannot confirm anything. All I can do is put forth my thoughts and suspicions but from what I see (which granted is a small section) the grain looks too tight to be pine.





I don't think pine was a real popular wood historically unless it was the common wood in the area. If the building belonged to the government or somebody of wealth, even if pine was common for the area it would still not likely be used for trim of a building, doors, or wall covering.

is there any place you can access the back of the panels? If you can find an unfinished area such as the back it would give you a lot more information. If there are cutouts for anything like maybe whatever that little door is to the lower right of the door in the one picture you may be able to see unfinished wood there.

but above all else, I cannot say I have ever seen pine paneling. Anytime I have seen pine used as a full wall covering it was planks rather than a full panel.
 

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Right now I'm concerned only with the casing. Can you confirm it's supposed to be cherry (wood, not stain?)
A decent picture or two of some of the other trim in the room may help. Is the baseboard original?
 

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A GENERAL thought without reading the string....there is a HUGE difference between for example pine stained with mo wax golden oak installed 20 years ago and the same pine stained with golden oak today. Age, sunlight, etc. all alter the color of the wood making it way hard to match.

The thought about leaving it a while might not have been too far off! Ron
 

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A better look at the paneling is needed--might be cherry --might be walnut---it is not likely that pine can be made to look like a hardwood---Identify the paneling--use that wood for the trim---If staining and finishing is not your strength---hire a cabinet finisher to match the paneling and prefinish the trim for you.
 

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It definitely doesn't look like oak. Cherry is my guess from the limited info. I think the door is also pine, just a different variety. It possible to make one species of wood mimic another provided select pieces are chosen. Popular is sometimes referred to as "poor mans cherry" as certain clear (not green) pieces of it can be stained to closely resemble cherry. Honestly, judging by the stain work in the pics, you might want to seek outside assistance in this venture if the requirements are as stringent as you say. O'mike's idea of enlisting a cabinet shop is a good one.
 

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Sorry to give you half remembered past, but it could be a start.
On red oak, ply, veneer and solid, I used 2 different colors of ZAR wood stain. One of them was golden oak. Base was 1:1 alcohol and amber shellac. It was a restaurant remodel and additional wood and trim had to match the existing.
Your second photo of panel jogged the memory.

If it's that important, you should start with sample pieces of different woods and try the stains that seem to be close. And finish - wax, urethane, whichever you need. The door trims in the other room could be the model.
 
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