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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is actually off an air filter, but a 3 speed squirrel cage blow is the same whatever it is in; isn't it?

It is a Jet AFS1000B. A schematic is on page 12 of Jet AFS-1000B 1000 CFM Air Filtration System, 3-Speed, Owner Manual | Manualzz...

It is about 15 years old and worked fine when I last used it a couple months ago.
Today it turns very slowly on low, a hair faster on medium, and shuts off on high. If I leave it on medium it shuts off after about a minute.
It turns freely by hand. If I get it spinning and turn it on, it acts like a brake. If I try to spin it faster when it is on low, it resists.

Any idea what might be wrong with it? Motor? Board? Capacitor?
Could I try wiring the motor to a simple on/off switch so it (hopefully) would just run on high?
Thanks.
 

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Have you feed the squirrel lately?

Just an attempt at humor.

Most likely the capacitor has failed.

Replacing the capacitor is relatively simple.

Get the exact micro-farad capacitor.

Turn power to blower off.

Capacitors may still store a charge, so use caution.

Mark all wires before disconnecting anything.

Yes the blower can be used as a single speed, but you still need the capacitor.
 

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My guess is bad motor bearings. I'm just kind of guessing here, but I've seen bad blower motors act kind of like how you describe before. My theory is that when the electric magnets inside are powered up, the bad bearings cause things inside to go all kittywampus and act like how you are describing.

If you wanted to try the capacitor anyways, according to your picture you would need a 20 microfared run capacitor with a rating of 250V or higher. The ones you found on Amazon do look like a match, or you could use a physically larger metal one instead if you can figure out a way to mount it and/or extend the wires if you have to.

My guess is that's not your problem, but for $10 the capacitor might be worth a try.
 

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This is a photo of the capacitor. Will this one on Amazon replace it?

3 years ago I bought a used sailboat named "Picofarad". I asked if he was a EE. He said he had no idea what it meant, he bought it that way.:whistle: View attachment 693935
Can't really tell, but your picture looks like there are more than two wires, but those may just be in the background.
 

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Connect them the same way as the original.

Did you mark the wires before removing anything?

Orientate the new one the same as the old one, writing facing you, connect wires accordingly.
 

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Today it turns very slowly on low, a hair faster on medium, and shuts off on high. If I leave it on medium it shuts off after about a minute.
It turns freely by hand. If I get it spinning and turn it on, it acts like a brake. If I try to spin it faster when it is on low, it resists..
Motor shims have degraded and fallen out of place. Unless you're truly a mechanical hobbiest, it's time for a new motor.

....
LOL, picofard for a boat name. Good laughs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I replaced the capacitor and it is actually worse; only runs at all when holding in the on button.
So it is not the capacitor.

I can buy a new off brand unit for less than either a replacement circuit board or motor. I would like to hope it is the circuit board and wire around it, so that it turns on with a toggle switch and runs on high. How exactly would I do that. The wiring is attached to my OP.
 

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Hoping it's the board won't help and will possibly hurt if you needlessly waste time or money based purely on that hope. The reality is that it's very unlikely to be the control board since that doesn't fit the described circumstances. Generally a bad board is an all or nothing proposition as it relates to the running of the motor; not the motor exhibiting different behaviors at different speeds. That behavior is most likely the motor itself... as has already been suggested. At this point, there's nothing further to suggest since you apparently don't have a multimeter to perform tests with. BTW, if you're interested in DIY then I would highly suggesting getting one. If you get at least a good midrange one, it can also test capacitance and would have saved you the time and money you spent hoping it was the capacitor. My multimeter has saved me thousands of dollars over the years; many others would say the same. Lastly, bear in mind that you don't necessarily need to buy the generally much more expensive OEM replacement motor. There are many universal blower motors on the market. You could look up the specs of the original and price compare other models that match it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hoping it's the board won't help and will possibly hurt if you needlessly waste time or money based purely on that hope. The reality is that it's very unlikely to be the control board since that doesn't fit the described circumstances. Generally a bad board is an all or nothing proposition as it relates to the running of the motor; not the motor exhibiting different behaviors at different speeds. That behavior is most likely the motor itself... as has already been suggested. At this point, there's nothing further to suggest since you apparently don't have a multimeter to perform tests with. BTW, if you're interested in DIY then I would highly suggesting getting one. If you get at least a good midrange one, it can also test capacitance and would have saved you the time and money you spent hoping it was the capacitor. My multimeter has saved me thousands of dollars over the years; many others would say the same. Lastly, bear in mind that you don't necessarily need to buy the generally much more expensive OEM replacement motor. There are many universal blower motors on the market. You could look up the specs of the original and price compare other models that match it.
1) The multimeter you know I don't have shows continuity between all the motor contacts, so it is likely okay.
2) If it is bad, then connecting it without the circuit board can't hurt it; so there would be no harm in trying.
3) Since the specs on the motor aren't available, trying to replace it with a generic would be difficult.
4) Your comment "the motor exhibiting different behaviors at different speeds" suggests that you didn't even read my OP.

Otherwise, you reply contained great insights and was extremely helpful.
 

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1) The multimeter you know I don't have shows continuity between all the motor contacts, so it is likely okay.
2) If it is bad, then connecting it without the circuit board can't hurt it; so there would be no harm in trying.
3) Since the specs on the motor aren't available, trying to replace it with a generic would be difficult.
4) Your comment "the motor exhibiting different behaviors at different speeds" suggests that you didn't even read my OP.

Otherwise, you reply contained great insights and was extremely helpful.
None of the pictures of that motor online show any info at all. The data plate will help us, unless your motor has burnt it away? Post a picture of it.

Which button are you referring to?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
None of the pictures of that motor online show any info at all. The data plate will help us, unless your motor has burnt it away? Post a picture of it.

Which button are you referring to?
I pulled the motor out and looked all over it; no data plate. The only printing was the Jet part number.
The power button. With a replacement capacitor it only moves at all when holding down the power button. With the original capacitor it ran very slowly on low. Since the two capacitors have the same specs they ought to work the same; wouldn't you think?
A youtube video says that replacing a capacitor on the circuit board can fix similar problems. I've never soldered a circuit board, but it is worth a try.
 

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I pulled the motor out and looked all over it; no data plate. The only printing was the Jet part number.
The power button. With a replacement capacitor it only moves at all when holding down the power button. With the original capacitor it ran very slowly on low. Since the two capacitors have the same specs they ought to work the same; wouldn't you think?
A youtube video says that replacing a capacitor on the circuit board can fix similar problems. I've never soldered a circuit board, but it is worth a try.
Random repairs aren't going to help you much, but can actually be a detriment. You really need to systematically eliminate issues until you find your problem.

Measure the motor diameter, body length, shaft length, and shaft diameter. How many speeds to you actually use?

Their wiring diagram is absolutely garbage. I'm not sure really what does what in it. They would have been as much help by just using a blank page.....

Is this switch the door switch or the main power switch? Wire across it temporarily.
 

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1) The multimeter you know I don't have shows continuity between all the motor contacts, so it is likely okay.
2) If it is bad, then connecting it without the circuit board can't hurt it; so there would be no harm in trying.
3) Since the specs on the motor aren't available, trying to replace it with a generic would be difficult.
4) Your comment "the motor exhibiting different behaviors at different speeds" suggests that you didn't even read my OP.

Otherwise, you reply contained great insights and was extremely helpful.
1) If you had a multimeter than you should have helped everyone help you by testing the motor at the outset and telling us the results. Since you didn't do that AND you spent time searching for, buying, and replacing the capacitor without ever mentioning anything about testing first, it seemed a reasonable conclusion that you didn't have a multimeter. BTW, it is possible to test a capacitor even with a multimeter that doesn't explicitly have a capacitance testing feature.
2) If you're certain that trying random things can't possibly cause any harm and is the proper course of action then why are you even here. Otherwise, I would reiterate the comment by supers05: "Random repairs aren't going to help you much, but can actually be a detriment."
3) The manual you linked to in the OP claims to be Operating Instructions and "Parts Manual". That would generally contain specs for the motor in it.
4) Yes, I did read your OP and my response was based on you saying "it turns very slowly on low, a hair faster on medium, and shuts off on high." Shutting off on high is unequivocally a different behavior than is being exhibited at other speeds!
 
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