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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
Trying to save some money, I replaced my old Fed Pacific breaker box with the above mentioned Square D box. It seemed so simple when I started and the more I read, the more confused I become. I am going to hire an electrician to look at it and make sure it is alright.

Here is my question: I put the two stranded aluminum hot wires from the meter into the two respective lugs and tightened them with an hex wrench. In the center of the two hot lugs is another hex lug with a large 'N' underneath it. I placed the neutral from the meter into this lug. Is this correct? If so, then what is this LK100AN neutral terminal kit which came with the box?

Many Thanks,
Russell
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply.

I guess I don't understand what the large center lug with the 'N' under it is for? I will take some picture and post them tomorrow.

Thanks,
Russell
 

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You got it, connect the neutral in the middle. Neutral and ground are bonded only at the box, you'll connect the ground at the same place or on the neutral bar. It ain't rocket science but make sure you get it right :)

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank so much. That is exactly as I did mine. I don't see the ground wire coming from the meter in your photo, though. Only the #4 copper from the ground rod? And yours looks much neater than mine.

Thanks again,
Russell
 

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The neutral lug kit is simply to allow you to feed a downstream sub-panel that requires a neutral in the feeder that is larger than what the neutral bars will accept. Or if the panel has feed thru lugs.
 

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The earth grounding depends on where the main disconnect is located. Is your panel main lug or main breaker? If it is main lug then where is your service disconnect? Out by the meter?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Also, there is a small clear mushroom shaped piece of plastic which came with the breaker box and I have no idea what it is for. Any ideas?

Thanks,
Russell
 

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It's ok but you really only needed a main lug panel. You should have 4 wires coming from the service disconnect out by the meter to the new load center...2 hots, the neutral and the ground. You should not have the main bonding jumper (green screw) installed thru the neutral bar of the new panel. Neutrals and grounds are kept unbonded. You only bond the neutral to the ground at the disconnect out at the meter. This is your service equipment not the the new panel. You only bond neutral to ground at the first means of disconnect. This is why you do not see the ground wire in the image posted. That is because the panel shown is the first means of disconnect (main breaker panel) and is fed by 3 wires from the meter. You have 4 wires because your service equipment is the disconnect at the meter not the new 150 amp panel.

Post a picture of the wiring of your panel so we can check things out.

You should also have earth grounding conductors going to possibly your metal water lines and a ground rod from the service disconnect.
 

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It seems that the main breaker panels are cheaper than the lug only panels.
 

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Asking if you did it right after the fact is kind of a bass-acwards way of doing things. Let me explain how these threads usually end. OP posts question about something they've done. They aren't really wanting to hear that they may have done something wrong. They are really just looking for reassurance they did it right, and thus really won't hear it any other way. Someone tells them that something is wrong, and explains why. OP says "But it works??". Someone else explains why it may work but is still wrong. OP has already done the job and doesn't want to hear any of that, so disappears and is never heard from again, most likely leaving his hack job just the way he finished it ignoring the good advice he recieved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Asking if you did it right after the fact is kind of a bass-acwards way of doing things. Let me explain how these threads usually end. OP posts question about something they've done. They aren't really wanting to hear that they may have done something wrong. They are really just looking for reassurance they did it right, and thus really won't hear it any other way. Someone tells them that something is wrong, and explains why. OP says "But it works??". Someone else explains why it may work but is still wrong. OP has already done the job and doesn't want to hear any of that, so disappears and is never heard from again, most likely leaving his hack job just the way he finished it ignoring the good advice he recieved.
Not me. I have to have it right - even if it means doing it over. I am going to post some pictures. If the forum consensus is that I should do it over, then I will. It didn't take very long to do it the first time and if it's not right at least I will know what I've done wrong. I searched the net for quite awhile before I found this forum and I am thankful for the information contained herein and even more thankful that there are knowledgeable electricians out there willing to share their wisdom. If I had found the forum sooner, things would have gone smoother for me. I have read countless books on the subject of residential electrical practices and insist that all the work I do is up to NEC standards. But I haven't found any books which explain, in language that I can understand, how to install the breaker box. My next post will have the photo and I look forwrd to the forum critique.

Thanks,
Russell
 

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Not me. I have to have it right - even if it means doing it over. I am going to post some pictures. If the forum consensus is that I should do it over, then I will. It didn't take very long to do it the first time and if it's not right at least I will know what I've done wrong. I searched the net for quite awhile before I found this forum and I am thankful for the information contained herein and even more thankful that there are knowledgeable electricians out there willing to share their wisdom. If I had found the forum sooner, things would have gone smoother for me. I have read countless books on the subject of residential electrical practices and insist that all the work I do is up to NEC standards. But I haven't found any books which explain, in language that I can understand, how to install the breaker box. My next post will have the photo and I look forwrd to the forum critique.

Thanks,
Russell
Well Russell you sound like someone worth helping IMO. While your getting the photo posted...ask us how if you have troubles...one of the first questions I have is what is the amp rating of the service main breaker out by the meter?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Okay, I tried to attach a photo by hitting the attachment link on this reply page. Hope it works.

I concluded that I needed a 150 AMP breaker box because of the 150 AMP breaker which is located out next to the meter. I suppose it was an ASS-umption on my part. Hopefully a correct one.

Hope the photo shows up.

Thanks,
Russell
 

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Don't only know electric

Asking if you did it right after the fact is kind of a bass-acwards way of doing things. Let me explain how these threads usually end. OP posts question about something they've done. They aren't really wanting to hear that they may have done something wrong. They are really just looking for reassurance they did it right, and thus really won't hear it any other way. Someone tells them that something is wrong, and explains why. OP says "But it works??". Someone else explains why it may work but is still wrong. OP has already done the job and doesn't want to hear any of that, so disappears and is never heard from again, most likely leaving his hack job just the way he finished it ignoring the good advice he recieved.
WOW! You said it all, I like your style.
 

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Okay, I tried to attach a photo by hitting the attachment link on this reply page. Hope it works.

I concluded that I needed a 150 AMP breaker box because of the 150 AMP breaker which is located out next to the meter. I suppose it was an ASS-umption on my part. Hopefully a correct one.

Hope the photo shows up.

Thanks,
Russell
The breaker size is fine. If it had been smaller, say like a 100 amp, then that would actually control the protection of the feeder to the new panel and you would not have a 150 amp capability.

Two main breakers in your situation is redundant but poses no violation. Looks like you have neutrals and ground separated (I don't see the green main bonding jumper) which is good. It should not be installed. You may have an issue with too many cables through one clamp but I can't see that part very well.

All your bonding and grounding electrode system connections are out at the service disconnect at the meter I would think.

The SEU cable you ran should be capable of 150 amps minimum. It looks like it is ok but should verify it is 2/0 at least.

Wire management could be better but we have seen much worse here. If the cables run up that wall cavity they should be fastened 12" or so after they leave the enclosure.

Working space in front of the panel looks good.

Main thing is you do have 4 wires feeding the panel with neutral and ground separated and all bonding taking place out at the service disconnect by the meter.
 

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Okay, I tried to attach a photo by hitting the attachment link on this reply page. Hope it works.

I concluded that I needed a 150 AMP breaker box because of the 150 AMP breaker which is located out next to the meter. I suppose it was an ASS-umption on my part. Hopefully a correct one.

Hope the photo shows up.

Thanks,
Russell
Looks pretty good. The only thing I would quibble about, as far as mechanical work, is that you brought a bundle of cables through one big knock out. It's not really serious enough to change at this point, but something that the inspector may not like. And for future jobs like this, don't do it.

You have 4 wires coming from the service disconnect, which is good.

EDIT: removed stupid comment made due to me not paying attention.
 
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