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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a wall that is out of square and out of plumb. Exterior 8" thick concrete block wall.

House is single story CBS construction in 1955. In 1972 the then owner converted what was a porch or patio into living space, and what you see is where they started the extension, where the new concrete wall and the old concrete wall met. Here is a picture of the wall configuration.



From the right side of the picture the wall runs to an outside corner, does a "dog leg" and turns for a distance of 2.5', then an inside corner, then the new wall continues. The 2.5' wide wall between the outside and inside corner is the out of square, out of plumb wall I want to correct.

I took off the sheet rock since I am doing a few other repairs and changes.

Both the old and new walls were built with 8" wide hollow concrete blocks to about 6' tall, then a solid tie beam of 2' deep goes on top. It seems to me when they poured the new tie beams they had sloppy form work and some of the mortar ran down over the blocks and created the uneven-ness, then they put 2X4s over it out of plumb and square, then mounted sheetrock over the 2X4.

I have put a strip of 1.5" wide blue masking tape on the wall and floor, showing where the plumb line should be, and where a square outside corner should be. Here are some additional pics with close ups.















Any thoughts and suggestions on how to build out a squared and plumbed corners ready for new sheetrock?

Normally I would just rip off the old lumber, run 1X furring strips vertically and shim to get to where I need to be. But they are off by more than 1.5" up top and more then 2" at the outside corner. I would have to use shims made of 2X4s!

Here is what I am considering.

(1) OPTION 1: Use 2X4 or even thicker lumber as shims attached to the concrete with Tapcon screws then run plumbed and squared 1X furring over those.

(2) OPTION 2: Try and correct the inside corner so the concrete there is plumb and square with the outside corner. This can be done with an angle grinder fitted with a diamond blade, basically shaving a vertical 3.5" wide vertical strip, so as to be able to mount a vertical PT 2X4 over it plumb but recessed a bit into the concrete, then I will make up the outside square corner however I need to. This will be the most laborious option and lots of dust, plus it may weaken the wall if I over cut.

(3) OPTION 3: Forget about the concrete wall totally, just build a new 2.5' wide wood studded wall sitting over the tiles, the new top plates can be secured to the concrete wall with L brackets or similar.

Thoughts, ideas?
 

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I see two options.
1.) cut long tapers out of 2 by material to create a plumb plane and then either mount the drywall to this, or fur them out and then drywall.
2.) shim out 1 by material and drywall as per above. Tapcon at each shim set. May require countersinking the tapcon heads.

Either way, bring the face of the tapers or furred out wall so that the finished product is plumb and square.

Your third option will likely be the easiest though.
 

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I would skip try to bring this into square unless I absolutely needed the room for cabinets, etc.
If I had a few inches to spare, I would just build a false wall in front of the existing wall.
If I had a few feet to spare, maybe enclose this area into a storage closet for the room, and just hide the out of square wall inside it. You could even do an angled wall on the left side to add interest if needed.

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Discussion Starter #4
I see two options.
1.) cut long tapers out of 2 by material to create a plumb plane and then either mount the drywall to this, or fur them out and then drywall.
2.) shim out 1 by material and drywall as per above. Tapcon at each shim set. May require countersinking the tapcon heads.

Either way, bring the face of the tapers or furred out wall so that the finished product is plumb and square.

Your third option will likely be the easiest though.
Yes probably option 3 is the cleanest and easiest. If I try to cut long tapers - it would have to be tapered from like 0 to 1.5" over 8', and most likely when I lay it against the wall the ends would fit and in between there are bumps and dips I need to shave or shim. Won't be pretty.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I would skip try to bring this into square unless I absolutely needed the room for cabinets, etc.
If I had a few inches to spare, I would just build a false wall in front of the existing wall.
If I had a few feet to spare, maybe enclose this area into a storage closet for the room, and just hide the out of square wall inside it. You could even do an angled wall on the left side to add interest if needed.

Follow me on Instagram:
"@amanteafinewoodworks"
I agree. I will put a false wall over it then. I don't need the 3.5-4" really.

Only thing is, the bottom plate would be sitting on top of the tiles. If one way I want to change out tiles it would be a real pain to get out the tiles. I wonder if I should take a grinder and cut where the false wall would be, chip out the pieces and have the bottom plate sit on the concrete slab.
 

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I agree. I will put a false wall over it then. I don't need the 3.5-4" really.

Only thing is, the bottom plate would be sitting on top of the tiles. If one way I want to change out tiles it would be a real pain to get out the tiles. I wonder if I should take a grinder and cut where the false wall would be, chip out the pieces and have the bottom plate sit on the concrete slab.
I would cut them back to the new false wall, and take out the remainder before hand. Cut a small piece of plywood to use as a jig for cutting the tiles straight and true. This will give you a register to set the new bottom plate against after the tiles are removed, and help keep the wall square to the room.

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Good idea you got there. Cut out enough to get the drywall included and cover any gap with baseboard.
 

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Good idea you got there. Cut out enough to get the drywall included and cover any gap with baseboard.
Actually, just cut enough for the bottom plate. The drywall could sit on top and cover the gap, eliminating the need to get base close to cover any breaks during the cut and removal.

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I would build a new wall around it. You can drill through the tile fairly easily with diamond tile bits to form holes for Tapcons. However if you'd rather rather use a grinder to cut out the tile with a diamond wheel, that would work too. The least amount of time, effort and dust would probably be with the bits and tapping straight through the tile. This does of course make it difficult to change out the tile in the future, but if it comes to that you could grind it out then when you finally have to.
 

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My first thoughts are:
Is the block/concrete wall sound?
Is there any leakage, seepage etc.
Otherwise covering it up seems harmless enough.

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