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DIY'r
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I know this is bad forum etiquette, but I'm having a hell of a time with this problem so I'm bumping it here. Some wiring in my in ground sprinkler system was disconnected when I went to turn it on this season, and I can't figure out how to get it put back together (first summer in new house, so I'm only 90% sure that it worked last year).

Originally posted in plumbing, which maybe wasn't the best place for it..

http://www.diychatroom.com/f7/sprinkler-control-wiring-re-connect-diagram-46598/

Thanks!
--Scott
 

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Do valves D and E operate at the same time? If so, connect valve B to either of the control lines that power those. Or, why not eliminate valve B altogether?

Ever the lover of equipment mods, you could set up a relay arrangement that allowed valve be to work when either valve D or E was energized.
 

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My first trade :thumbup:

Simply remove the diaphram from valve B and the water will flow freely thru it.

Turn off the vacuum breaker, release the pressure, remove the 8 screws, remove the diaphram, use a razor knife to cut the center portion out (the outer portion acts as a gasket), Reinstall the gasket an you will have a quick fix.

The rubber "gasket" only goes in one way so pay attenrion.
 

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DIY'r
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Do valves D and E operate at the same time? If so, connect valve B to either of the control lines that power those.
Nah, but I was thinking of hooking it up that way. But I'd probably get too much of a drop in water pressure if they did.

Or, why not eliminate valve B altogether?
That's my fall back position.. I was hoping to get it wired, but in another thread a guy suggested that I just turn it on manually, and leave it on. Kinda like 220/221's advice, but with less work. :yes:

Ever the lover of equipment mods, you could set up a relay arrangement that allowed valve be to work when either valve D or E was energized.
Heheheh. Way ahead of you -- I plan on having it computer controlled, but maybe not until next season. Then I'll be able to actuate any combination of valves I want.

But, I was really hoping there was a way to wire this up just because I like that idea better.

Also, I think the original idea of valve B was so that if a leak develops in one of the lines it's only leaking when the system is on. There's only about 1-2ft. of line between the valves and the meter pit.

It might be a code thing in my area, something like "all zone control valves must be within X feet of the meter"...

Turn off the vacuum breaker, release the pressure, remove the 8 screws, remove the diaphram, use a razor knife to cut the center portion out (the outer portion acts as a gasket), Reinstall the gasket an you will have a quick fix.
Good to know, and definitely easier than pulling out the valve completely. But do you see any problem with just turning the valve on manually and leaving it on? (<-- Not being sarcastic, I really don't know).
 

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UAW SKILLED TRADES
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I have no idea why someone put that valve B where it is, btw I have a few Hunter irrigation systems under my belt.

Valve B would have to be told to stay on while 3 runs and shuts down then 4 runs and shuts down. No can do with your controller/timer. If valve B was before all the zone valves then it would be a master valve and a wiring terminal for it would be on the controller terminal block.

Essentially when the 1st zone is scheduled to run the controller turns on the master valve and it fills the main line. Each zone is then tapped from that main line. Zone 1,2,3,4 will run their scheduled times then the master valve will be closed by the controller until the next watering schedule.

One solution is if the valve B can be opened by a 1/4 to 1/2 CC turn of the solenoid some valves can be turned on in this manner. Just leave it on. No cutting up the diaphram this way but it doesn't really matter it needs to be on and stay on.

You cannot wire it to work ahead of zone 3 and 4 because the controller will turn it off as it advances to the next zone.

Even if it was two program capable you could not run two programs at the same time in order to keep valve B open.

Valve b was someones oversite on how the system worked. You could wire the valve to an independent timer if you have two unused wires available but that is more hassle than than just doing as 221 suggested or seeing if the valve is the type that can be opened by turning the solenoid.
 

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UAW SKILLED TRADES
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I'm not sure and maybe some one has already seen this but I believe that little lever next to the solenoid turns the valve on and off manually.
 

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DIY'r
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm not sure and maybe some one has already seen this but I believe that little lever next to the solenoid turns the valve on and off manually.
That was going to be my next question. While I was testing everything, I tried to move that lever. It didn't seem to move, on any of the valves. It says < ON - OFF > so I feel like a complete idiot. Do I just need to torque the hell out of it? (Didn't want to break the thing off).



PS - Thanks for all the quick responses.. really appreciated. Trying to wire this up to work with valve B just about caused my brain to explode last week. Now I don't feel so bad. :laughing:
 

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UAW SKILLED TRADES
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They are very stiff. So give it a good effort. If the valve is under pressure it may take a good amount of force. Or go over to the orbit site and see if you can find the valve and instructions but I think you just need to use a little more force.
 

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Most manual valves bleed off the water outside so that's probably not an option. If your manual valve bleeds the water back into the system, that's the way to go.

Water pressure pushes the diaphram down, sealing off the water flow. The solonoid valve lifts up a plunger and lets the water bleed off and relaxes the diaphram.


Well, crap. Just unscrew the solonoid and remove the plunger....duh :jester:
 

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I don't think this valve bleeds water to the outside, most manuals that do that have a bleed screw instead of a on-off lever. The lever essentially does what 220/221 said it lifts the plunger and holds the valve open. However it looks like there may be a bleed screw on your valves along with the on-off lever. If so bleed the valve to get the pressure off it then open the valve. I'd turn the supply off while your doing this.
 
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