DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello! I'm not sure if this is the right place for this question, but my husband had some of his friends spray paint a mural in our baby's room (due 9/4.) It's super cool and we love it, but I didn't even think about the chemicals/safety until it was complete. I'm looking for advice on how to make it as safe as possible. It was finished three days ago, but it's still pretty stinky. We've had the window open, and I have an air purifier in there that filters out VOCs. I read somewhere that heating the room can make the paint off-gas more quickly, so I'm trying that with a space heater--doing several hours of heating the closed up room and then opening it all back up and using fans to ventilate. A friend recommended some kind of sealant, but I've heard mixed things about how effective this would be in creating a more chemical free space. We aren't living in the house yet, but the idea that these fumes might never go away is stressing me out. The artists did such an amazing job though, and I can't imagine taking it down or covering it up. I'd appreciate any advice. Thank you!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,898 Posts
My only thoughts on this are to continue to let it off gas as you are doing right now. Keep windows open and the air purifier going and get a fan running in there to push the air towards the window. Once you've done that for a week or so (or when the fumes seem to be gone), I would seal it with a water-based polyurethane. Of course, it, too has its share of fumes, but it will seal up the spray paint which is the bigger concern at the moment. Other than that, I'm not sure what else you could be doing........
 

·
retired painter
Joined
·
10,044 Posts
I agree, it's going to take fresh air ventilation to speed up removal of any odor/fumes. A water based poly will also protect the mural some and make it easier to clean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
804 Posts
Hello! I'm not sure if this is the right place for this question, but my husband had some of his friends spray paint a mural in our baby's room (due 9/4.) It's super cool and we love it, but I didn't even think about the chemicals/safety until it was complete. I'm looking for advice on how to make it as safe as possible. It was finished three days ago, but it's still pretty stinky. We've had the window open, and I have an air purifier in there that filters out VOCs. I read somewhere that heating the room can make the paint off-gas more quickly, so I'm trying that with a space heater--doing several hours of heating the closed up room and then opening it all back up and using fans to ventilate. A friend recommended some kind of sealant, but I've heard mixed things about how effective this would be in creating a more chemical free space. We aren't living in the house yet, but the idea that these fumes might never go away is stressing me out. The artists did such an amazing job though, and I can't imagine taking it down or covering it up. I'd appreciate any advice. Thank you!


Window fan set to exhaust.

Or box fan (a lot lot cheaper than a window fan) sitting on window stool to blow indoor air outside.

You should have other windows open so outside air is pulled in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,933 Posts
The fumes WILL go away. I understand your concern, but they will dissipate with a little bit of time. Keep an open window for a few days if possible. If you arent living there, you have no safety concerns right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,005 Posts
We aren't living in the house yet, but the idea that these fumes might never go away is stressing me out.
One good thing about Volatile Organic Compounds is that they are in fact volatile. It'll go away. Sometimes it can take a few months to totally go down to outdoor levels. But you said they sprayed the mural, which is kind of unusual. I'm imagining your husband is a biker dude and hangs out with the guys on American Chopper and they came and air brushed flaming skulls and stuff on the walls of the nursery with some noxious automotive paint. That might take a little longer.

Usually what happens with nurseries is the baby winds up sleeping in Mommy and Daddy's room for the first 6 months anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I'm imagining your husband is a biker dude and hangs out with the guys on American Chopper and they came and air brushed flaming skulls and stuff on the walls of the nursery with some noxious automotive paint. That might take a little longer.

Usually what happens with nurseries is the baby winds up sleeping in Mommy and Daddy's room for the first 6 months anyway.
Haha thank you! Not quite but kind of. He has some graffiti artist friends who just used regular oil based spray paint. Not sure if that's just as bad. It took them 18 hours in total to finish, so I think there's a lot of layers upon layers of paint in there. Yes, good point--at least she won't be sleeping in there for a bit. The smell seems to be dissipating, albeit slowly. Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #9

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
My only thoughts on this are to continue to let it off gas as you are doing right now. Keep windows open and the air purifier going and get a fan running in there to push the air towards the window. Once you've done that for a week or so (or when the fumes seem to be gone), I would seal it with a water-based polyurethane. Of course, it, too has its share of fumes, but it will seal up the spray paint which is the bigger concern at the moment. Other than that, I'm not sure what else you could be doing........
Thanks so much. This sounds like a great option. The fumes are getting better, but are definitely not gone. I found a eco-friendly sealant but it's not designed to cover oil based paint. I will start researching water-based polyurethanes. They've got to be less caustic then the spray paint?

Thanks so much:)
 

·
retired painter
Joined
·
10,044 Posts
Generally it's not a great idea to use a waterbased poly over an oil base coating but if you use an oil base poly it will 'yellow' any existing light colors. If you intend to paint over this mural down the road, might be ok to just leave as is. The fumes will dissipate with time.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top