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Discussion Starter #1
I have an old house (built in 1946) near the ocean. The foundation in the back has spalled off, exposing the mudsill in some places. The worst spalling is 4" deep - you can see the mudsill and a few rotted anchor bolts.





A home inspector and a handyman/contractor both looked at it and thought it could be patched. A foundation contractor came out and says it's not patchable - he recommends excavation and replacement of the rear foundation, which involves demoing part of our living space.

In the 2-5 year timespan, we plan to remodel and extend this wall anyway - but we can't afford to do this remodel now, and it seems silly to excavate and demo only to redo it all just a few years later.

The foundation does not have much sag - no big vertical cracks, about 1" of sag from the front of the house to the back. Not bad for a 70 year old tract home! But the foundation is degrading rapidly and rainy season is just arriving.

I need a stopgap that can hold the degradation at bay for a few years. My plan is to:

- use a wire brush to remove the loose concrete and aggregate
- spray the existing foundation with water
- pack on rapid set mortar mix to patch all the missing holes (would cement-all be better?)

How terrible is my plan? Obviously it doesn't fix the foundation bolt problem, but we're paying for earthquake insurance anyway. Again - earthquake resilience is a priority for the remodel - but we need to live in it as-is for a few years first.
 

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its 'patchable' which means only temporary,,, never should any exterior slab be attached to a structure,,, aquafin 2km is a flexible conc,,, cementall's a polymer-modified repr mortar
 

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retired framer
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I don't think that is spalling, when the bolt rusted and expanded it blow the concrete apart and I think it is fine just like that for a few years.


 

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JOATMON
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I agree with Neal

If there is no sagging of the foundation and the soil is solid....AND...you plan to add on in a few years.....leave it as is.

The contractor is always going to want to go the route that gives him the most business.....not that he is wrong....I don't think it is repairable either. At most, make it look pretty
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ahhh - the rusting bolts causing the blowout makes a lot of sense. The houses on either side are identical in construction, but mine is the only one with this problem, and I believe the earthquake bolting was a retrofit. I'll be sure to investigate the other bolt locations and make sure they aren't causing the same issue! Have to demo some interior walls to even look, so that'll wait for the remodel too.

Thanks all for the help!!
 

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Guapo
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stadry, 2 questions: Why don't you want a slab attached to a structure? Is it because the slab could shift?


You mention a lot of products that I never see in Home Cheapo. Are they readily available in a stone yard?
 

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there are different forces for exterior slabs than structures,,, no arch/eng/designer/contractor would tie them together
the products we generally use are found in bldg restoration repair suppliers or pro conc supply houses
we buy pvc pipe & bagg'd conc from the apron/vest stores,,, we do't even buy 6mil for crawl space vapor barrier work
comment re contractors wanting more work may be applicable to some but not many im-n-s-h-fo,,, think most want to do good work, made a decent profit, & add positives to their reputation
 

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Just making sure. The bolts you see are not earthquake reinforcements. They are just regular bolts installed to hold the house.

Your wall kind of looks like mine.:smile:
Another is, your siding looks flush with the sheathing underneath. Rain can hug the building materials and soak your foundation. Slipping a narrow sheetmetal between the siding and wood board would protect it even more. Painting the wood also.
 

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Property Mgt/Maint
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I would patch it. Only thing I would do different would be after cleaning, brush a coat of WeldCrete bonding agent to the the wall. Then use regular mortar Type S. Trowel it on in layers to build it back out. Let set for 24-48 hrs between coats.
 
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