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Discussion Starter #1
I have a shower area that is 5' wide, 7' long. Two sides of it are concrete block walls which I am attaching 1x3 PT furring strips. The other side is interior wood studded wall.

Is there a certain spacing to place those vertical strips to make it easier to attach the durock or hardibacker boards? For the 5' wide area I was going to attach 4 strips spaced 15" apart but then I though this is probably not going to result in having the butt end of two durock panels on a strip. What is the best spacing to use?

How do they cut the durock panels? Does it require a concrete saw or do you score it with a knife and snap like sheetrock?
 

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Just make sure the joints on the cement board are going to land on the furring strips.
You can use a knife to score the panels -
we use a saw (wear a dust-mask!!!!)
Use Cement-board screws - not D-Wall screws - to fasten the panels.
 

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Every 16", good luck trying to just score a 1/2 thick panel and snap it.
I use a carbide blade or a diamond blade on a ciruler saw.
Wear a dust mask and work out side there's going to be dust everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Every 16", good luck trying to just score a 1/2 thick panel and snap it.
I use a carbide blade or a diamond blade on a ciruler saw.
Wear a dust mask and work out side there's going to be dust everywhere.
If I go every 16", in other words:

|---16"---|-----28"-----|---16"---|

I will end up with a space of 28" in the middle. I can't put one right in the middle because I have a thermostatic valve, a diverter valve, and a shower outlet all along that vertical line.

If I put one to either side of the middle, then I will end up with:

|---16"---|--9"--[10"]--9"---|---16"---|
 

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That would be fine as long as there all less then 16".
 

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I see a couple of problems on the horizon---Your furring strips are only 3/4" thick---then you hit concrete---if you can't use thicker furring strips---be careful with your screws---you may bottom out on the concrete and pull the strips loose---

As to cutting durrock?

A sharp knife will let you score and snap like drywall.
For dust free sawing--I use a 4" diamond saw and slap a wet sponge against the blade---no dust.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A sharp knife will let you score and snap like drywall.
For dust free sawing--I use a 4" diamond saw and slap a wet sponge against the blade---no dust.
Can you elaborate "slap a wet sponge against the blade"? You mean wipe down the blade with a wet sponge? Would like to know exactly how to do that. Thanks.
 

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This is the type of saw that I use (Harbor Freight model)

The blade spins fairly slow---when cutting I dunk a sponge into a bucket of water and press it against the blade and start cutting---squeeze the sponge as you go and dust is gone---

one quick wipe of the board removes and slurry---been doing it that way since 1998---

Saw is on sale for about $39---I replaced the 1998 one a year ago--the cord was getting ratty--
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I see a couple of problems on the horizon---Your furring strips are only 3/4" thick---then you hit concrete---if you can't use thicker furring strips---be careful with your screws---you may bottom out on the concrete and pull the strips loose---
Yes I thought about that. I guess I am going have to use short cement board screws.

They sell 1-1/4" long ones.

So the 1x strips are 3/4" thick, and the board is 1/2" adding to 1-1/4". If there are any thickness variations or I drive the screw too deeply I might hit concrete before the screws bottoms.

I can't use thicker strips as the existing strips are all the same thickness. What I might have to do is for those shower walls that are against 1x strips on concrete blocks I use 5/8" cement boards to give a little extra thickness. The interior walls are not a problem since those are 2x4 studs.
 

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Discussion Starter #12

This is the type of saw that I use (Harbor Freight model)

The blade spins fairly slow---when cutting I dunk a sponge into a bucket of water and press it against the blade and start cutting---squeeze the sponge as you go and dust is gone---

one quick wipe of the board removes and slurry---been doing it that way since 1998---

Saw is on sale for about $39---I replaced the 1998 one a year ago--the cord was getting ratty--
Thanks. I might have to try that. Are you concerned about the wet sponge carrying water into the saw and the parts inside the housing?
 

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The thing is designed for use with a water hose attachment---totally useless---I never had an issue--
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Another related question.

If you have to make a special cut for a non-circular hole, such as when a shower valve, where I need to cut a six sided shape to include not only the valve dial but access to the stop valves on either side.



How would you cut a shape like this? I have several to cut.

For circular holes I have diamond coated hole saw bits.

For odd shapes like this what is the best way?

Use an oscillating tool like a JobMax with a carbide blade?

Use a rotozip to craft it out?

Use a drill with masonry bits to drill holes every 1/2" then bang it out with a hammer?
 

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I have the Chicago Electric from Harbor Freight---

Make those odd cut outs using your new saw or an angle grinder---just make a plunge cut right through the board----

A jig saw with a carbide blade works well,too.
 
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