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I'm planning to install a manual transfer switch in my home to allow me to power some of the house off a generator in case of a power failure.

This is the switch: Reliance Controls ProTran2 510C
Which I'm not allowed to link to yet, because I'm new here.

My question here is related to positioning of the switch. It comes with a ~1ft flexible conduit, which I'm instructed to use to connect to the main panel.

What confuses me is 2017 NEC 110.26(A)(2): Spaces About Electrical Equipment, Working Space, Width of Working Space

Here's where I'd like to install the switch: Space 1 in the below image.



The question is this: Does the transfer switch need to be installed 30" away from the main panel? Or does the 30" working space width not apply to transfer switches? Or am I misinterpreting this part of the NEC?

I'm planning to install this flush mounted in the wall, like the main panel (if that matters).

Thanks!
 

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Working clearance refers to the space in front of the panel. You need 30" of clearance laterally for each piece of equipment. So 15" from center of breaker panel going left, and 15" from center of xfer switch going right. Extend those imaginary lines 36" (IIRC) in front and that is the space that needs to remain clear (to a height of 78" IIRC).

From your pics it looks like you can meet those requirements.

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So 15" from center of breaker panel going left, and 15" from center of xfer switch going right.
Close, but not totally accurate.
You can start at the left edge of the panel and measure 30 inches to the right. Or start at the right edge of the transfer switch (in location #1) and measure to the left. Nothing says that the space needs to center on the panels.

I’m pretty sure there is a stud to the left of the panel. I’d just consider the 32 inches from that stud center to the center of the stud to the right of the transfer switch as my working space width.
 

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I'm confused at the answers....
If you have two electrical panels they can be close to each other, as close as a chase nipple if desired. The working space is measured from the front of the panel outward and side to side when referring to clearance.
One panel mounted next to the other does NOT interfere with that clearance.
IE the panels do not have to be separated.
Walls, plumbing pipes or other equipment cannot be in front of the panel.
 

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The panel does not need to be centered. The workspace can be shared.
 

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Oso is absolutely correct. The 30" does not have to be from center. It can go from edge or center or anywhere in between (this allows for about 7.25" adjustment either way since most resi gear is 14.5" wide).

And you can stack 20 panels in a row if you like as long as they all meet the obstruction clearances in front and in the space surrounding them.

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The 30" work space CAN OVERLAP another panel's workspace. So if you have two 15" wide panels right next to each other, the 30" wide space in front of them is all you need for both. They are each other's workspace :)

However, I don't recommend you get one of those Reliance gizmos. They don't support AFCI/GFCI properly, they only support a few circuits, and they're from a second rate supplier (i.e. NOT Eaton GE Siemens Square D). Also, they're expensive as all getout!

$300 is ridiculous.

Noting that your panel looks like a Murray, a good panel, I recommend either a) putting a generator interlock on your main panel, and Siemens/Murray does a good job supporting this.

Or, get a Siemens/Murray subpanel ($70) and add $25 generator interlock.

Two breakers ($10 x 2) to go into the interlock plus one in the main panel ($10) to feed it. Now any circuit you want to power off the gen, you simply move it to this subpanel permanently, and it just works. You can move 26 circuits if you want. Any number of 2-pole breakers! Any number of MWBCs (and you have some of those, and you cannot just stick those on a reliance panel unless you know what you are doing, but with this panel it takes care of itself). GFCI works. AFCI works. They don't trip the moment you go to generator. There's no funny shenanigans with the neutral wire. No spaghetti, it looks pro, it *is* pro, and you keep your Siemens breakers. And it's less than half the price.

Oh, and it scales - if you get a bigger generator, you only have to change 1 cable and nothing else.
 
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