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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Water heater at one end of house, bathroom at the end - takes a long time to get hot water at the bathroom. Bosch whole house gas fueled tankless water heater.

One thought is to put a water temperature activated tankless heater at the bathroom - it provides for immediate hot water until the hot water arrives from the Bosch main heater. Is this viable and if so what company makes such electric heaters?

Other options?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

thanks.

Looking for something other than a recirculating system - hence looking for the on demand solution. Our usage schedule is not predictable for timed usage. Plus our hot water usage is low (just my wife and I; no houseful of kids).

I also note the comment on the highlighted unit that it may not work with tankless water heaters. I think because the recirculating flow is not enough to activate the heater.
 

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A Grundfoss 3 speed recirc pump will work. Also, they have a timer so they can be set up for when you usually us that bathroom. Course, you'll have to run a seperate recirculation line. You already spent too much money on a tankless unit, why not waste another $2000 and have one dedicated for that bathroom?
 

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A Grundfoss 3 speed recirc pump will work. Also, they have a timer so they can be set up for when you usually us that bathroom. Course, you'll have to run a seperate recirculation line. You already spent too much money on a tankless unit, why not waste another $2000 and have one dedicated for that bathroom?
:laughing::laughing::laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A Grundfoss 3 speed recirc pump will work. Also, they have a timer so they can be set up for when you usually us that bathroom. Course, you'll have to run a seperate recirculation line. You already spent too much money on a tankless unit, why not waste another $2000 and have one dedicated for that bathroom?
Thanks, but I have already commented that a recirculating system is not desired and why.

I do not consider the existing tankless unit I have a waste whatsoever. I did not spend anywhere near $2000 on my existing tankless heater. My gas bills are in the under 10th percentile of comparables due to it - having had it for several years it's ROI is proving itself. Financials aside, we enjoy the endless hot water.

Don't know why you felt the need to make disparaging rather than helpful remarks. Nor do I know why others enjoyed your comments. Both seem unnessisary and counter to the usually helpful and positive spirit of this forum.
 

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Don't know why you felt the need to make disparaging rather than helpful remarks. Nor do I know why others enjoyed your comments. Both seem unnessisary and counter to the usually helpful and positive spirit of this forum.
Oh come on now. Tankless heaters do not enjoy a great reputation. If you have something that works, that's great. From the stories I have heard, you are in the minority though. Maybe it's because so many people are so in love with their tankless that we never hear about it. I don't really know but I don't think 666 comments were really that bad.

you have been around long enough to know levity is standard here and sarcasm not a stranger either. I took 666's comments as a bit of truth and a bit of hyperbole. If I insulted you, I apologize. I meant no harm. I just saw humor in 666's post and commented.
 

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Sorry, just a joke. I've installed quite a few of those things, but if I'm ever asked for my opinion of them by the customer, I tend to try my darndest to dissuade them from getting one. But that's just one plumbers opinion.
 

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There is a company called Eemax that makes small point-of-use tankless heaters. I suspect you'd have to upgrade the electric to your bathroom to use one. A better idea might be a small (5- or 6-gallon) "regular" water heater. Might be cheaper in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
md2lgyk said:
There is a company called Eemax that makes small point-of-use tankless heaters. I suspect you'd have to upgrade the electric to your bathroom to use one. A better idea might be a small (5- or 6-gallon) "regular" water heater. Might be cheaper in the long run.
I don't see a temperature activated unit on the Eemax company web site - am I overlooking it?

Electrical upgrade is not a problem. This will be implemented as part of a remodel.

As for a small tank I am wanting to avoid maintaing a tank of hot water. That's what makes my tankless cheap to run is not doing so. Also not sure how this solves the problem. For example, when taking a shower after the few gallons of the small tank are exhausted the initial cold water of the long lines come into and through the tank which will not have the rise time to heat the water. One would have the initial hot water from the local small tank and then a period of cold water and finally the hot water from the whole house tankless. Unless I am not understanding?

Thanks!
 

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One would have the initial hot water from the local small tank and then a period of cold water and finally the hot water from the whole house tankless. Unless I am not understanding?
as long as the tank contained as much water as the pipes running from the tankless to the tank, you would have no interruption of hot water.


You should be able to figure that out with a bucket in the tub. Start running water and when you get hot water, measure what's in the bucket.

as to what you need: it would appear you need a thermostatically controlled heater that controls the discharge water temp. I suspect that as the hot water from the big heater gets to the smaller one, it would compensate and start reducing the heating of the water and if you set it to a temp lower than the incoming water, it would basically shut off and simply allow the water to flow through it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
as long as the tank contained as much water as the pipes running from the tankless to the tank, you would have no interruption of hot water. .
I am not seeing how this does not have an interruption of hot water - the cold water in the pipe would not be long enough in the tank to warm?

as to what you need: it would appear you need a thermostatically controlled heater that controls the discharge water temp. I suspect that as the hot water from the big heater gets to the smaller one, it would compensate and start reducing the heating of the water and if you set it to a temp lower than the incoming water, it would basically shut off and simply allow the water to flow through it.
Exactly what I am trying to do - looking for the thermostatically controlled heater to do this.
 

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I found this information on the internet, so it must be accurate!:thumbsup::
There is .0081 gallons of water in one foot 0f 1/2" pipe.
There is .0339 gallons of water in one foot of 3/4" pipe.
I could not find the info on 3/4, but if you had 100 feet of 1" pipe
There would be 3.39 gallons in it. If this is the case, a six or ten
Gallon heater would have plenty of hot water stored until the hot water from the Bosch arrived.
 

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vsheetz;637762]I am not seeing how this does not have an interruption of hot water - the cold water in the pipe would not be long enough in the tank to warm?
duh, never mind. Not sure what I was thinking. I kind of forgot about that little thing about the dead water in the pipe.

Instead of the little heater, put a big one in so the cold water will do nothing more than temper the hot water.

Obviously that is a joke. I understand your intent and desire.



Exactly what I am trying to do - looking for the thermostatically controlled heater to do this.
I went to the eemax site and they had an entire section of thermostatically controlled units.

go here http://www.eemaxinc.com/EX100T-DI?searched=thermostatic+control&advsearch=oneword&highlight=ajaxSearch_highlight+ajaxSearch_highlight1+ajaxSearch_highlight2

go to products, drop down menu> search by product type and there is will list the types of heaters. I saw a low flow and high flow thermostatic control. Not real sure what you are looking for or need.



I had a page the other day that had all the units displayed on a common page. Can't seem to find that at the moment.
 
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