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Discussion Starter #1
The sharkbite shutoff valve on my toilet started leaking, probably because the end 1" of copper stub has deformed somewhat after 30 years of various fitting installations. I opened the drywall, and wanted to cut off the end 1", and solder on an extension. I have several concerns.

1) The nearest soldering point will be just 1.5" away from the existing angle joint (see picture). Will this be a problem (damaging the nearby existing joint)?
2) Will the soldered on extension be strong enough for the tension it might experience from the supply hose, and from the twist force when we turn the valve on and off? The existing joint is protected from such tension by the metal anchor fixed on the wood stud (see picture).
3) If tension is not a concern, which shutoff valve would you recommend (compression vs sharkbite)?
4) Somewhat related to #2, what is a good length for a 1/2 copper stub out of the wall and still strong enough? (In this case, starting at the wall with a soldered coupler)?

Thank you so much for your inputs!
631252
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I'd like to add another question. The end 1" of the stub, which has small deformations from multiple compression fittings, can it still be used for soldering, and result in a strong joint?
 

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1. If you place a small wet rag on the elbow and keep the area where you solder dry, it will help with by absorbing some of the heat. Don't solder deformed or wet pipe.
2. You will have to run a blocking between the two studs then secure the elbow to the blocking.
3. I would use shark bite on exposed pipes only. I much prefer compression or threaded angle stops.
4. 3" nipple is good length out of the finished wall.
 

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I have no experience with them, but would a Sharkbite valve have wrench flats where the pipe enters? Whichever type of valve it is, I’d be more inclined to think that the valve to pipe sealing system is the problem, rather than the copper pipe itself, so the simplest solution to this problem might be to just replace the valve. If it is a compression fitting (but it doesn’t look correct for that either), a tiny tightening may be all that is required. I infer from the second part of your second question that you’re turning the valve on and off on a regular basis. Most of these valves get turned off only when the toilet requires maintenance or replacement. If yours is being exercised all the time, I suggest that you fix the problem that is causing you to do that.

If you continue with your soldering plan:
  1. I agree with @dj3 on his answer. Because of the orientation of the pipe, there may be water dribbling out towards the fitting that is to be soldered, especially if the upstream valve is not cutting off flow completely. If there is any water present, don’t bother soldering. The heat will go into vaporizing the water rather than increasing the temperature of the fitting enough to melt the solder. If the upstream valve successfully shuts off water you can just push a flexible straw in and suck out a bit of water to ensure that nothing is spilling over the corner of the elbow. If this is your first time soldering, I suggest to buy some fittings and get some practice first.
  2. Yes, the solder is very strong.
  3. I can’t compare the two systems, so I can only suggest that if you use compression that you get some input from folks here first before using one, if it’s your first time. The usual problem is that people overtighten them. I’m not a plumber that needs to leave the jobsite and hopefully never return, so my method to not overtighten is to err on the side of undertightening, then keep tightening a tiny bit until a paper towel touched to the joint reveals that there is no longer any leakage. There is a third option of a soldered valve.
  4. Strength isn’t going to be an issue. You could have 12” projecting into the room and it would handle the torque of the valve handle being turned. Whichever type of valve you choose to use, consider how much pipe will be inserted inside the valve.
  5. Solder will fill in small imperfections in the pipe with no impact on the strength of the joint.
Chris
 

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If you have access to the pipe below (crawlspace, etc.) then converting this section to PEX would make things much easier. You can either solder on the PEX adapter where it's more easily accessible, or you can just put a Sharkbite push-to-connect fitting on there. Your Sharkbite valve should work fine on that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
1. If you place a small wet rag on the elbow and keep the area where you solder dry, it will help with by absorbing some of the heat. Don't solder deformed or wet pipe.
2. You will have to run a blocking between the two studs then secure the elbow to the blocking.
3. I would use shark bite on exposed pipes only. I much prefer compression or threaded angle stops.
4. 3" nipple is good length out of the finished wall.
Thank you! I will try those.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I infer from the second part of your second question that you’re turning the valve on and off on a regular basis. Most of these valves get turned off only when the toilet requires maintenance or replacement. If yours is being exercised all the time, I suggest that you fix the problem that is causing you to do that.
You are right. I do realize I shouldn't have used it like a faucet. I installed a new toilet flapper (together with this shark bite valve) last week, and the flapper has not functioned properly. I was planning to replace the flapper this weekend. I turned the sharkbite shutoff valve off and on a total of less than 10 times, and the valve started leaking. So I assume something is wrong with either the valve or the pipe.

If you continue with your soldering plan:
I agree with @dj3 on his answer. Because of the orientation of the pipe, there may be water dribbling out towards the fitting that is to be soldered, especially if the upstream valve is not cutting off flow completely. If there is any water present, don’t bother soldering. The heat will go into vaporizing the water rather than increasing the temperature of the fitting enough to melt the solder. If the upstream valve successfully shuts off water you can just push a flexible straw in and suck out a bit of water to ensure that nothing is spilling over the corner of the elbow. If this is your first time soldering, I suggest to buy some fittings and get some practice first.
Yes, the solder is very strong.
I can’t compare the two systems, so I can only suggest that if you use compression that you get some input from folks here first before using one, if it’s your first time. The usual problem is that people overtighten them. I’m not a plumber that needs to leave the jobsite and hopefully never return, so my method to not overtighten is to err on the side of undertightening, then keep tightening a tiny bit until a paper towel touched to the joint reveals that there is no longer any leakage. There is a third option of a soldered valve.
Strength isn’t going to be an issue. You could have 12” projecting into the room and it would handle the torque of the valve handle being turned. Whichever type of valve you choose to use, consider how much pipe will be inserted inside the valve.
Solder will fill in small imperfections in the pipe with no impact on the strength of the joint.

Chris
These are great information. Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If you have access to the pipe below (crawlspace, etc.) then converting this section to PEX would make things much easier. You can either solder on the PEX adapter where it's more easily accessible, or you can just put a Sharkbite push-to-connect fitting on there. Your Sharkbite valve should work fine on that.
Thank you for the suggestion. In this case, I don't have access to the pipe from below.
 
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