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I had a perimeter drain installed in a basement room that had leaks in major rain storms. Room is gutted down to poured walls, floors and exposed joists. Rooms seems to stay dry now; ready to build walls.

Problem: How can I attach sole plate to the concrete floor without introducing leaks? I will move the sole plate & build the framed wall out a couple of inches from the concrete wall to miss the plastic perimeter drain, but even beyond the drain the concrete the installer used to fill their trench is thinner than the main poured floor and I suspect it will leak if I Ram-set nails into it. The installer suggested using construction adhesive to secure the sole plate.

I am looking for a solution that will pass inspection. My county publishes guidelines for basement remodels that specifies 8D nails 16"OC into the concrete. I doubt that adhesive alone will pass.

Any ideas?

Guy
 

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IF you can't talk your inspector into concrete screws, use them anyway but countersink the heads then use a little dab of silicone under the nailheads of 8D nails :thumbup:

seriously, you raise a good point as
waterproofers aren't conc folk, they're drainage guys so often replaced concrete is less than desired in comprehensive strength -

talk to your inspector - it won't be the 1st time he's ever seen this & asking him for his help makes him feel better - UNLESS his bride, nagzilla, has recently been on his ***, that is
:laughing:
 

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Yeah, the concrete used to fill the trench is certainly less dense than the main floor. Plus, it's maybe 1 1/2" to 2" concrete over 3/4" crush packed around the perimeter drain tile instead of 4" concrete like the floor.

I'm sure concrete screws would pass inspection, but seems like an even bigger risk of water incursion through the concrete under the sole plate. I also considered sinking double-end-threaded lags studs into the concrete, which I could seal around, and then bolting down the sole plate. In the end, both those options make larger and deeper holes into the new concrete than the Ram-set nails.

I should have set lag bolts into the wet concrete. Lesson learned.

I'm thinking I'll try adhesive alone, and take the chance on Ram-set nails if the inspector insists. Good advice still welcome, though!!!

Guy
 

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IF you can't talk your inspector into concrete screws, use them anyway but countersink the heads then use a little dab of silicone under the nailheads of 8D nails :thumbup:

seriously, you raise a good point as
waterproofers aren't conc folk, they're drainage guys so often replaced concrete is less than desired in comprehensive strength -

talk to your inspector - it won't be the 1st time he's ever seen this & asking him for his help makes him feel better - UNLESS his bride, nagzilla, has recently been on his ***, that is
:laughing:
every time I read one of your posts, I find another issue with my job :wink:

same thing here - thin concrete - I haven't framed in and probably won't.
 

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I'm thinking I'll try adhesive alone, and take the chance on Ram-set nails if the inspector insists.
Ayuh,... So how thick is the sole plate,..?? it's a 2x ain't it,..??

I'd use the glue, 'n 1½ nails,...:whistling2:
 

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I would not worry about water coming up. If water were to come up through the screw holes, the water would come up without screw holes. That is, through the crack between the old concrete and the new concrete (that;s not a perfect seal) or through the concrete itself.

The only thin you need to worry about is not cracking the thinner layer of concrete into small pieces where you drill or screw or nail.

If you get moisture coming up then the perimeter drain is overloaded or not functioning properly or clogged. Sometimes an overload can be cured by putting in another sump pump pit, at the opposite corner of the house from the first pit.

Having a perimeter drain does not give you permission to discharge gutter water up against the foundation.
 
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