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Discussion Starter #21
Just to clarify, below is the photo with arrows pointing to the stiff bare copper wires. The one coming from above connect to what remains of the copper pipes. The one coming from below seems to be driven into the ground

 

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Discussion Starter #22
I decided to go with 200 amps cable from the socket meter box to the circuit breaker box (the hot was cut right in the middle and I could not replace only one wire (neutral) given the way they were entangled in the sheath/insulation). The socket meter box is rated for 200amps, and I only hope that the wire lug connection in the circuit breaker panel will be large enough to fit a 200 amps.

The cable I bought comes in a grey sheath, with two hot wires insulated with a black sheath; but the the neutra does not have its own insulation. The neutral should not travel inside to circuit breaker panel without any insulation. Should I twist the neutral strands and then insulate it with electrical tape? What would be the best electrical type around for that?

thanks
 

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The non-insulated conductor in a cable assembly is a ground, not a neutral.
You can not just tape it to fix it.
You bought the wrong wire for the purpose at hand.

Hire an electrician before you burn the house down.
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
The non-insulated conductor in a cable assembly is a ground, not a neutral.
You can not just tape it to fix it.
You bought the wrong wire for the purpose at hand.

Hire an electrician before you burn the house down.

You are just pathetic. I did not buy the wrong cable, I bought a 200 amps cable
I am an engineer, not an ignorant electrician. Maybe you want to talk about Hall Effect, Lorentz Forces, or maybe the Node Method
 

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You are just pathetic. I did not buy the wrong cable, I bought a 200 amps cable
I am an engineer, not an ignorant electrician.
Just because the cable is rated for 200 amps, does not mean that it is approved for the use that you are attempting to use it for. You have 2 hots and a ground, not a neutral. (Or 1 hot, 1 neutral and a ground)

Your "engineering pride" is what makes you dangerous.
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Just because the cable is rated for 200 amps, does not mean that it is approved for the use that you are attempting to use it for. You have 2 hots and a ground, not a neutral. (Or 1 hot, 1 neutral and a ground)

Your "engineering pride" is what makes you dangerous.
My understandings is that in this setup: two hot wires (120V and 120V, for each hot busbar; thus 240 volts potential exist) and one neutral wire (goes to the neutral bar, and usually carry almost no potential) arrives from the meter. When talking about the "ground", I am referring to the alternative return path (locally derived from ground rods or copper pipes)

The reason for what I mentioned electrical tape is given the fact that the previous setup had electrical tape covering the heavy duty neutral wire which then connects to the neutral bar. So I was wondering if that was acceptable practice.
 

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Is this an SE cable? If so, I've never seen the neutral of an SE cable wrapped with tape. No prohibition for wrapping that I know of, just unnecessary in my opinion.

Don't really appreciate the "ignorant electrician" crack even if it's not directed at me.
 

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Discussion Starter #28 (Edited)
Is this an SE cable? If so, I've never seen the neutral of an SE cable wrapped with tape. No prohibition for wrapping that I know of, just unnecessary in my opinion.

Don't really appreciate the "ignorant electrician" crack even if it's not directed at me.
Yeah, it is an aluminum Service Entrance Cable (the same type was there before). And the portion of the neutral cable travelling inside the circuit breaker panel was all taped.

Sorry, it was a moment of rage.
 

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Have you pulled a permit for the service change? Usually, the inspector has to call the POCO for reconnection in a situation such as yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Have you pulled a permit for the service change? Usually, the inspector has to call the POCO for reconnection in a situation such as yours.
I did not pull a permit (maybe my bad), but I called poco and requested to have the power cabled disconnected at the pole. Then, I asked them what would be the procedure to have it all reconnected again and they told me that I should simply call them back to reconnect the cables and create an account.

And I am following all the measurements, etc. I do not believe that that they would complain if I use 200amps cable with a 100 amps circuit breaker, but I am pretty sure that the opposite would be a huge code violation and real hazardous situation.
 

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I don't know of any POCO that will reconnect a service change without a passed inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
I don't know of any POCO that will reconnect a service change without a passed inspection.
Well, as it can be seen from my posts I never dealt with that type of situation before. Besides there is another issue, as I pointed out before, most of the internal wiring was stolen; and I am afraid the inspector will not only inspect the meter socket box and the main circuit breaker panel, but also the power outlets, lights switches, etc, and I am not going to do everything at once (one branch at the time).

As a backup plan, I have an array of 2 100watss solar panels, charger controller, inverter, deep cycle batteries, and the good old gas generator.
 

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Well, as it can be seen from my posts I never dealt with that type of situation before. Besides there is another issue, as I pointed out before, most of the internal wiring was stolen; and I am afraid the inspector will not only inspect the meter socket box and the main circuit breaker panel, but also the power outlets, lights switches, etc, and I am not going to do everything at once (one branch at the time).
Service inspections are done all the time without the branch circuit wiring completed. You REALLY need to consult your local inspection department and discuss your plans and options.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Service inspections are done all the time without the branch circuit wiring completed. You REALLY need to consult your local inspection department and discuss your plans and options.
Thanks, I will contact them. The property is in Ohio, I am in Michigan now. I will contact them and follow up with them on my options.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
If you have 4/0 aluminum SE cable it probably won't fit into a 100 amp breaker.
Yeah, that was one of my initial questions. Thanks

The thing is that the previous circuit breaker panel was rated for 75amps (according to the label), but once I took the original damaged SE cable to the hardware store and compare with others it seemed apparent that the original cable was more than 100 or 125 amps (actually seemed to be 200amps). If it does not fit I can always exchange the now 100 amps panel for something larger.

It would great if everything was well document, marked, and labelled.
 
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