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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been rebuilding my deck and it used to be level with a tar and gravel roof, now I have a slope to it so water will drain into a gutter, the front balcony is angled forward. The problem is that it looks funny from the front of the house.










 

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Don't worry. You do not need to slope the deck. Water will drain through it between each floor board, so slopng it wouldn't have much effect. Just make sure that the roof below the deck is adequately sloped (looks good in the pic) and that the roofing materials are in good shape. Also be sure to minimize penetrations through the roof below, and repair/seal all the necessary connections.

I almost missed this: it looks like the current configuration you have bears on a continuous wood beam, which sits on the roof's edge. That edge should bear minimally - just touch down in 2-3 places (depending on span) to allow all the water to drain off of the low side of this roof. You don't want water pooling behind a dam-like beam for sure! Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I will be putting fiberglass over 3/4" plywood on top of those joists so I will need the slope which is at 1/4" per linear foot right now.



Here is a pic from underneath.


 

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I'm not sure why you want to install fiberglass over plywood for a deck surface - exterior at that . . . The plywood will delaminate over time, and the fiberglass has some problems as a walking surface (I'll admit that I don't know much about that). So, if that what you want to do, I can think of one solution to improve the look of your deck. Wrap the perimeter with a continuous, level band board. You can use PT wood, cover it with fiberglass panels if you like, whatever. If it is level and deep enough to cover the sloping side of your deck, a perimeter band will improve the look of your deck's edge condition. I recommend sealing it at the seams if you plan to butt it against the fibergalss walking surface - wrapping the fiberglass membrane up the sides, over the top and down the front face would be ideal. Or, hold it away from the side of the deck (structural beams and walking surface) about 1/2" or so water can potentially drain over all of the edges - this scenario eliminates the concern you may have about water freezing in the cracks/joints.

Good luck. So, why have you chosen this method and materials anyway?
 

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1/4" per foot is a lot of slop for a smooth surface. I am pretty sure 1/8" would be plenty to allow it to drain well. You may even "feel" the 1/4" when standing on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm not sure why you want to install fiberglass over plywood for a deck surface - exterior at that . . . The plywood will delaminate over time, and the fiberglass has some problems as a walking surface (I'll admit that I don't know much about that). So, if that what you want to do, I can think of one solution to improve the look of your deck. Wrap the perimeter with a continuous, level band board. You can use PT wood, cover it with fiberglass panels if you like, whatever. If it is level and deep enough to cover the sloping side of your deck, a perimeter band will improve the look of your deck's edge condition. I recommend sealing it at the seams if you plan to butt it against the fibergalss walking surface - wrapping the fiberglass membrane up the sides, over the top and down the front face would be ideal. Or, hold it away from the side of the deck (structural beams and walking surface) about 1/2" or so water can potentially drain over all of the edges - this scenario eliminates the concern you may have about water freezing in the cracks/joints.

Good luck. So, why have you chosen this method and materials anyway?

fiberglass decks are common here in Vancouver. They can last up to 30years and cost about the same as the new vinyl Duradeck stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
1/4" per foot is a lot of slop for a smooth surface. I am pretty sure 1/8" would be plenty to allow it to drain well. You may even "feel" the 1/4" when standing on it.

I'm starting to think your right. 1/4" is alot and it does look like you would feel it when standing there. I think I will tuck in a 2x4 to get it back up to an 1/8". That will solve alot of problems.
 

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After you bolt all those guardrail posts on, cover them with two lapped courses of the garage siding, at fascia level. Use enough height to level the boards over the lowered garage end. Install the intermediate pickets level on top, so the guardrail will be higher, or thicker at the slopped end. From the street, it will all look copacetic. Be safe, G
 
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