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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to know how to replace a wood subfloor that has been put over a crack slab. We were wanting to place another slab over the existing slab
 

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It really depends on how it was built in the first place. If it was put in after the building was completed, you would remove it in reverse order.
Base moldings, finished flooring, subfloor and floor joists.
Is this in a basement or a garage?
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The house caught on fire. So when they rebuilt instead of pouring a new slab they built a subfloor with plywood and studs. We would like to do away with the subfloor and add a slab on top of the other slab
 

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The house caught on fire. So when they rebuilt instead of pouring a new slab they built a subfloor with plywood and studs. We would like to do away with the subfloor and add a slab on top of the other slab
Depending on what surrounds this added structure, an additional slab may be inappropriate.
Just because you have a fire, would not mean you would build the structure you indicate. Why would you cover the thing that wouldn't burn, with something that will burn.
It would help if you told us where this structure was located in the house.
Is this a slab on grade house with no basement?
Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's the main slab with no basement we live in louisiana. the reason they did the subfloor is because the slab cracked.
 

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This is a bit puzzling. You say the original slab cracked, so the owner? put in a wooden subfloor over the slab to "solve the problem?" Now you want to remove the wooden subfloor, and place more concrete over the old slab. But you do not indicate that the original problem that caused the original slab to crack has ever been addressed.

Given that you are in Louisiana, there are large parts of the state that are subject to expansive soils. You may have an underlying foundation problem, possibly a drainage problem, or you may be on expansive soils. If so, putting down more concrete will cost you money, and will result in two cracked slabs instead of one. You need to hire a company or an engineer to determine the cause of the original problem, then you need to fix the problem, before you spend more money creating a new problem.
 
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