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Skid steers come in many different sizes and with wheels and tracks. They are heavy and filled with dirt, they are even more heavy.

The contractor mitigated the risk but you accepted that risk by allowing them to operate the skid steer on your driveway. No installer is going to accept responsibility for this.

I can see from your photo that the driveway was built on top of the land and not dug un. The area alongside it was then filled with dirt to level it with the driveway. As the skid steer drove over it, the dirt compacted along side the driveway making it more likely for the concrete to crack. If the dirt along side the driveway was compacted well prior and layers of plank were used, this would have been much less likely to have happened.

My family used to own a portable restroom business and our drivers were instructed to never drive on sidewalks curbs or personal driveways. We learned after getting a couple bills from the developers for repairs that you don't drive heavy equipment on any concrete structures other than roadways.

If it was me, I'd just patch it up the best I could by drilling rebar into the solid parts and filling with new concrete and finishing to match.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Skid steers come in many different sizes and with wheels and tracks. They are heavy and filled with dirt, they are even more heavy.

The contractor mitigated the risk but you accepted that risk by allowing them to operate the skid steer on your driveway. No installer is going to accept responsibility for this.

I can see from your photo that the driveway was built on top of the land and not dug un. The area alongside it was then filled with dirt to level it with the driveway. As the skid steer drove over it, the dirt compacted along side the driveway making it more likely for the concrete to crack. If the dirt along side the driveway was compacted well prior and layers of plank were used, this would have been much less likely to have happened.

My family used to own a portable restroom business and our drivers were instructed to never drive on sidewalks curbs or personal driveways. We learned after getting a couple bills from the developers for repairs that you don't drive heavy equipment on any concrete structures other than roadways.

If it was me, I'd just patch it up the best I could by drilling rebar into the solid parts and filling with new concrete and finishing to match.
It was a wheeled bobcat s550. Similar in weight to a large SUV.
 

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benefit of doubt given, 1 shot when new - the other after sodd'd,,, as w/many other threads, more info helps,,, picture framing says much about the concretist - both quality of work & character,,, more'n likely a track'd bobcat wouldn't have caused damage BUT still need edges protected
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Pic1 has the damage located above what appears to be a slab corner. In pic2, the red circle does not include a corner.

It sure appears fishy.
Lots of dirt and mud in the first picture. At the top and bottom of the picture you can see the control joints on either side, with mud in them. No slab corners were affected or pictured.
 

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Suggestion:

Go back to builder and have him talk to sub about-redoing it properly...if he won't, then politely say the alternative will be a PE's report on inferior and gross negligence of prep work, then more paper work will follow from an atty [mention you hate them too but if you need to do so, you will, plus all your OOP costs for PE & atty will be part of your invoice...Emphasize that is a last resort and you would rather not go that route...

If soil was not compacted after fill dirt applied, game over...you have a strong case..the real question is just how much of your entire driveway has unpacked fill dirt, then concrete poured over it? Is there any plastic/vapor barrier under the broken out concrete? If not, there's a good chance the fill dirt could have wicked away water and adversely impacted the drying/bonding of the concrete. Esp so if the R-Humidity was low at the time of the pour...more water leaving the top and bottom faster, quicker drying and less bonding of the adhesives in the mix...
 
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